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Win A Free Entry to The OSM Seaside Triathlon and Duathlon

(Posted on: May 3, 2018)

The OSM Center has partnered with Trifitness to give away a FREE entry to this years Triathlon and Duathlon, as well as many other great prizes! All you have to do is show us how you are training and getting ready for this years event.  Take a picture of your training or workout routine and use the hashtags #SeasideSprint and #OSMCenter, or tag us on Facebook or Instagram (@OSMCenter).

Whichever picture has the most Likes between May 5 – May 19, will win a FREE entry into this years contest!

But that is not all – there are even more prizes!

2nd place winner will receive a FREE entry to the Kiwanis Westport Triathlon sponsored by The OSM Center.

3rd place winner will receive a gift certificate from ROAD ID.

So what are you waiting for?  Start sharing your selfies and use the hashtag #SeasideSprint and #OSMCenter or tag @OSMCenter on Facebook and Instagram.

**Please note that all profiles must be set to “Public” for Likes to be calculated.  Those with profiles set to Private can not be calculated and will not be entered into this contest.


Dr. Gerard Girasole On How His Patients Inspire Him

(Posted on: March 22, 2018)

 

Our own Dr. Gerard Girasole was recently interviewed by Spine Universe on what led him to becoming an Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and how his patients continue to inspire him each day.  Read his interview below:

Gerard J. Girasole, MD, is an Orthopaedic Surgeon and Adjunct Clinical Professor at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University. Dr. Girasole told SpineUniverse, “From a very young age, I was always intrigued and interested not only to become a doctor but to become a surgeon. I worked in hospitals as a teenager, I even worked in doctor’s offices seeing patients with the surgeons and going to the operating room to observe surgery. I felt that I was never happier than when being in an operating room and the amazement of the human body and was fascinated by the operative procedures.”

Furthermore, he stated, “When I was a resident, I was going to become an oncology surgeon, but I worked with neurosurgeons during my residency, and I became intrigued with the instrumentation, complexity of the surgery and the ability to make a real difference in someone’s life by either correcting a deformity or neurological function. It is for this reason that the best field for me would be spinal disorders.”

How do Dr. Girasole’s patients inspire him?

He answered, “As a spinal surgeon, I see patients who are suffering with significant morbidity, whether it is intractable leg or back pain that really affects their quality of life. A lot of these patients feel lost because they believe they will never regain normal functionality. I’m inspired by my patients who come back after surgery and tell me that I’ve given back their quality of life—which I think is no better a feeling than helping another person and giving them back what they cherish most.”

“I have been blessed to be touched by many patients, but one patient still resonates in my mind. She was a 58-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer. She required a very extensive operation, which is known as an anterior/posterior procedure to reconstruct her spine. Post-operatively, she could function and according to her, I gave back her quality of life, albeit for a short period of time. She was able to live a normal life, but unfortunately passed away from cancer. Before her death, she sent me a cherub with my name on it; the scars of her surgery are on the cherub’s wings. That cherub sits on my bookcase overlooking me, and I feel that it is an angel whom she has sent down to watch over me.”


THE OSM CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL 2018 SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES

(Posted on: March 22, 2018)

Release Date: March 21, 2018

Contact: Kate Nadler, (203) 268-2882, knadler@osmcenter.com

 

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull is accepting applications for a $2,000.00 scholarship and several additional scholarships.  The scholarship is open to high school athletes planning to attend college in the Fall of 2018.

OSM is looking for outstanding high school seniors who excel in three areas: student athletic achievements, academic accomplishments, and community service.  The scholarship is open to high schools where OSM serves as team physicians: Bassick, Bunnell, Central, Fairfield Ludlowe, Fairfield Warde, Masuk, Notre Dame, St. Joseph, Stratford, Trumbull, and Warren Harding.

“We take great pleasure in seeing our student athletes succeed on and off the field as they work toward achieving their goals.  As team physicians being able to watch these students grow throughout their high school careers is encouraging and exciting as it further extends our connection to our community,” said OSM Orthopaedic Surgeon Michael Redler, MD.

Interested students must complete the application, which is available from their high school guidance department or Athletic Director. The application may also be downloaded by clicking here.

Applications must be submitted by Friday, May 11, 2018 to Kate Nadler, Sports Medicine Coordinator, at The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center, 888 White Plains Rd., Trumbull, CT 06611.  OSM will select winners June 2018.

OSM includes orthopaedic surgeons:  Michael R. Redler, M.D., Peter S. Boone, M.D., Gerard J. Girasole, M.D., David J. Martin, M.D., James I. Spak, M.D., Mark E. Wilchinsky, M.D., and Nathan P. Douglass, M.D., In addition: Isaac Cohen, M.D., Gene Tekmyster, D.O., Marissa M. Smith, M.D., Michelle Pagliaro Haywood, D.C., Benjamin G. Barnes, D.C., Alan H. Feldman, D.P.M., Rolando R. Lopez, PA-C, Raymond M. Sheehan, PA-C, John M. Carravone, PA-C, Michael J. Hann, PA-C, Kaitlyn A. Nadler, ATC.

OSM surgeons specialize in all aspects of bone and joint surgery as well as sports medicine and spine surgery. The team also consists of chiropractors, a podiatrist, physiatrists, physician assistants, and athletic trainers. OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Shelton, Stratford, and Westport as well as The OSM Therapy Centers in Trumbull, Fairfield, and Shelton.

OSM now offers a walk-in clinic OSMSTAT at their Trumbull and Westport locations for your urgent orthopaedic needs.  Their website is www.osmstat.com.


Closed Today due to inclement weather

(Posted on: March 13, 2018)

Our offices will be closed today, Tuesday 3/13/18 due to inclement weather.  We will reopen for normal business hours on Wednesday 3/14/18.



sports medicine trumbull
Does a Sports Medicine Specialist Only Treat Sports-Related Injuries?

(Posted on: February 26, 2018)

To properly treat an injury, it is essential to go to the right type of doctor. Patients who have sustained orthopedic injuries and are unsure if they should see a Sports Medicine Specialist or Orthopedic Surgeon will benefit from the information provided in this post.

Sports medicine is a popular medical subspecialty of orthopedics. Family practice and internal medicine doctors may subspecialize in sports medicine as well. Sports Medicine Specialists complete a one to two-year fellowship in Sports Medicine after residency training. They are specifically trained to diagnose and treat a wide range of injuries that can occur while playing sports, exercising, or performing activities required for daily living.

 

Types of Injuries Our Sports Medicine Specialists Treat

The following types of injuries are commonly seen and treated by the Sports Medicine Specialists at The OSM Center:

  1. The overstretching or tearing of a ligament.
  2. The overstretching or tearing of a muscle or tendon.
  3. Bone damage caused by high force stress or impact.
  4. Ligament or tendon tears: Damage to the structures that attach muscle and bone or keep joints in proper position.

These types of injuries may be sustained in any part of the body, including the shoulder, arm, wrist, hand, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot.

 

Types of Patients Our Sports Medicine Specialists Treat

Patients who fall into the following categories see great results when they have their injuries treated by the Sports Medicine Specialist at the OSM Center:

  1. Active individuals. Individuals who regularly exercise or participate in outdoor activities. Walkers, runners, weightlifters, hikers, swimmers, and people who participate in similar activities are all considered active individuals.
  2. Manual laborers. Individuals who have physically demanding jobs. Construction workers, mechanics, carpenters, firefighters, and maintenance and warehouse workers are some of the most common types of manual laborers.
  3. Individuals who sustain a sport’s type of injury. A fall or slip while walking, running, or cleaning can result in a sport’s type of injury.

In addition to these types of patients, sprains, strains, and fractures are also commonly seen in many other patient populations for various reasons.

 

Making an Appointment with Our Sports Medicine Specialists

 Patients who have injuries like the ones mentioned in this post are encouraged to make an appointment with one of the Sports Medicine Specialists at the OSM Center at any of our 5 Fairfield County locations.

The first step in properly treating the injury is accurately diagnosing it.  Once a diagnosis is made, our experts develop a treatment plan to help heal the injury in the shortest time frame possible. A variety of treatment options may be used for maximum results that include both non-surgical and surgical options. The road to a complete recovery starts when you make an appointment with the Sports Medicine Experts at the OSM Center.


Is Pain Management the Right Treatment Option for You?

(Posted on: February 26, 2018)

At The OSM Center, our Pain Management Specialists are medical doctors who focus on identifying, diagnosing, and treating different types of pain. Patients who are in pain and want relief can find it when they choose to be seen by a Pain Management Specialist at The OSM Center. Pain Management does not necessarily mean only pain medication, but a variety of treatment options that will lead to improvement and relief of pain. Pain management might be the right treatment option for you if you fall into any of the following categories:

 

1—Your pain does not respond to conservative treatment options

Pain that does not respond to conservative treatment options may need a special type of treatment approach. Some, but not all, commonly used conservative treatment options include the following:

-Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs)

-Physical Therapy

-Rest

-Immobilization

-Activity modification

The decision to see a Pain Management Specialist may be one your doctor encourages you to make or one that you make on your own.

 

2—You suffer from chronic pain

Chronic pain is one of the most common conditions seen by Pain Management Specialists. Your pain may be considered chronic if it meets the following criteria:

-Lasts longer than twelve weeks

-Lasts longer than the expected period of healing

Many times the cause of chronic pain can be hard to determine. A Pain Management Specialist works with patients who have chronic pain to come up with an individualized treatment plan that reduces or eliminates symptoms.

All of the following conditions are commonly treated by pain management specialists:

-Neuropathy

-Osteoarthritis

-Rheumatoid arthritis

-Lower back pain

-Neck pain

-Sports injuries

-Tendon or ligament injuries

The treatment options used to treat these and other conditions are numerous. At The OSM Center, our Orthopedic and Sports Medicine experts work hand in hand with our Pain Management Specialists to create a unique plan based on your lifestyle and goals.

Finding a Pain Management Specialist

If you are ready to find the solution to your pain problem, please contact any of our 5 Fairfield County, CT offices to make an appointment with one of our specialists.

pain management trumbull

The OSM Center Announces “Wide Awake” Procedures for Hand and Wrist Conditions

(Posted on: January 15, 2018)

Beginning in February 2018, Dr. Nathan Douglass and Dr. Michael Redler, the hand and wrist specialists at The OSM Center, will begin to utilize a safer alternative to traditional hand and wrist surgeries, known as “Wide Awake” surgery.  Unlike traditional procedures that require patients to undergo general anesthesia, Wide Awake procedures require only the use of a local anesthetic and thus eliminates the risks commonly associated with general anesthesia such as nausea, drowsiness and needing to fast before surgery.  Prior to the procedure, a local anesthetic is injected only into the surgical area so that the patient can remain awake and alert.  Following the procedure, only a few small sutures or bandages are needed and the patient can return home shortly after the procedure.

 

Dr. Douglass and Dr. Redler will be treating patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger syndrome, cysts and other conditions with this newer and safer type of procedure.  In fact, these procedures require only the use of a single needle to numb the surgical area and, in most cases, take under 30 minutes to perform. This not only minimizes surgical time and risk of infection, but allows patients to return home far faster than traditional procedures.  Additionally, these awake procedures can reduce the overall cost to the patient as no anesthesia fees are billed and no pre-surgical clearance is needed.

About Dr. Michael Redler

Dr. Michael Redler is a founding partner of The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center. He specializes in sports medicine as well as hand and upper extremity surgery. Dr. Redler attended medical school at the University of Connecticut. He did his residency training, including Chief Residency year, at the University of Virginia, where he also completed his Fellowship training in sports medicine and upper extremity with one of the godfathers of sports medicine, Dr. Frank C. McCue, III.  Currently, Dr. Redler is a visiting Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Virginia. In addition, he is an Assistant Professor at Sacred Heart University for the Departments of Athletic Training and Physical Therapy. Dr. Redler is also an Assistant Professor at the Frank H. Netter School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University. Additionally, Dr. Redler is the head team physician for Sacred Heart University and all of their 32 Division I varsity teams.

About Dr. Nathan Douglass

Dr. Nathan Douglass specializes in hand, wrist, elbow and nerve surgery in addition to orthopedic trauma.  Dr. Douglass earned two Bachelor of Science degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, double-majoring in Chemical Engineering and Biology. He received his M.D. from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Douglass completed internship, orthopedic surgery residency, and served as Chief Orthopedic Resident at Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Dr. Douglass completed the Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery Fellowship at Stanford University, training under hand surgeons from the Orthopedic and Plastic Surgery Departments.


Understanding the Causes of Chronic Neck Pain – and How They Are Treated

(Posted on: December 20, 2017)

Cervical spine pain, which is most often referred to as just neck pain, is one of the most common medical complaints in the United States. Finding out the underlying cause of neck pain helps determine your treatment options.

The medical professionals who are most qualified to diagnose and treat neck pain are The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center spine specialists. Their education, experience, and skills allow them to make accurate diagnoses and create customized treatment plans.  We also have 5 offices located throughout Fairfield County, CT.

 

Common Causes of Chronic Neck Pain

Certain injuries and medical conditions can cause neck pain. The most common injuries include the following:

-Muscle strains

-Ligament sprains

-Cervical compression fractures

-Cervical disc herniations

-Cervical stenosis

Strains and sprains typically heal after a short period of active recovery and icing.

Compression fractures and vertebral fractures can heal according to their severity and the medical condition of the patient.  However, it is always best to contact an orthopedic spine specialist to determine the severity of the fracture and to create a treatment plan.

However, sometimes neck pain can be caused by a more serious spinal condition that should be addressed by one of our spine specialists.  These can include:

  1. Vertebral osteoarthritis. The wear and tear of vertebral bone, associated joints and soft tissue.
  2. Degenerative disc disease. The weakening of the intervertebral discs that reduce the load placed on adjacent vertebrae.
  3. Spinal stenosis. The narrowing of the spinal canal and subsequent pinching of the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots.
  4. A herniated disc. An intervertebral disc that has herniated posteriorly (towards the back of the body) into the spinal canal.

An important part of treating these conditions is recognizing their symptoms.

 

Symptoms of Chronic Neck Pain

Neck pain can range in severity and each patient may experience varying levels of pain based on their condition and overall pain tolerance. Other symptoms that may accompany pain include the following:

-Stiffness

-Decreased range of motion

-Muscle tightness

-Upper extremity pain, weakness, and/or numbness

These symptoms and the condition that causes them can be controlled using appropriate treatment options prescribed by an orthopedic spine specialist.

 

Treatment Options for Chronic Neck Pain

The majority of cases of neck pain are effectively treated using nonsurgical treatment options. Usually, our spine specialists use a conservative initial treatment plan that includes any or any combination of the following:

-Activity modification

-Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications

-Pain medications

-Physical therapy

-Steroid injections and/or other interventional procedures

If neck pain does not respond to nonsurgical treatment options or increases in severity, our Orthopedic Spine Specialist may recommend surgical treatment options. Surgeries used to treat neck pain can now be performed with a minimal invasive technique. The following are the most commonly performed minimally invasive spine surgeries:

-Cervical discectomy

-Cervical disc replacement

-Nerve decompression

-Cervical fusion

 

Seeking Treatment for Neck Pain

Patients who are experiencing neck pain and associated symptoms are encouraged to make an appointment with one of our trusted spine specialists to learn what treatment option is perfect for their condition.  With 5 locations in Fairfield County, CT scheduling an appointment is easier than ever.

neck pain

pinched spinal nerve
Understanding a Pinched Spinal Nerve: Causes and Treatments

(Posted on: December 20, 2017)

Nearly everyone has heard the term “pinched nerve” and this condition affects nearly all patient populations. However, many may not be aware of what causes this condition or how it is treated. 

A pinched spinal nerve usually occurs in the cervical (neck) or lumbar (lower back) regions of the spine.

To learn more about what a pinched vertebral nerve actually is, it is important that we go over some related spinal anatomy.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, we highly suggest contacting one of our awarded Orthopedic Spine Specialists at any of our 5 Fairfield County, CT locations.

Related Anatomy

The spine is divided into four regions: cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacrum. The vertebrae of each region are uniquely shaped and when the spine is healthy and anatomical, the vertebrae perfectly align to form the spinal canal—a narrow opening that allows the spinal cord to travel from the brain to the lumbar and sacral region. As the cord travels down the canal, it branches out to supply the organs and muscles of the body with nervous system functions. The tiny openings through which the spinal cord nerve branches exit the spinal canal are called intervertebral foramen.

 

Causes of a Pinched Spinal Nerve

The term pinched nerve refers to a compression of one these nerves or never branches. The condition is most often caused by the following medical diseases/conditions:

  1. The wear and tear of soft tissue and bone with age.
  2. Spinal stenosis. The narrowing of the spinal canal.
  3. Degenerative disc disease. The weakening of the intervertebral discs that facilitate movement and act as shock absorbers between adjacent vertebrae.
  4. Herniated disc. The expulsion of an injured intervertebral disc into the spinal canal.
  5. Vertebral fracture. The fracture of a portion of a vertebra.

Once one of our spine specialists has identified the cause of a pinched nerve, they can develop an effective treatment plan based on your unique lifestyle and the severity of your symptoms.

 

Symptoms and Treatment of a Pinched Nerve

The most common symptoms of a pinched nerve include localized pain in the neck or lower back and/or weakness, numbness or tingling in extremities. An effective treatment plan is one that significantly reduces or eliminates symptoms. The following are some commonly prescribed nonsurgical treatment options:

 

  1. Activity modification. Slowing down or stopping activities that cause symptoms and promoting pain free mobility.
  2. Physical Therapy – By strengthening the surrounding back and neck muscles, the pressure on the nerve can be minimized.
  3. Chiropractic Care and Treatment – A combination of active movement and hands on treatment will be able to provide symptom relief and return to function.
  4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Over-the-counter and prescription medications that decrease nerve inflammation and pain.
  5. Pain and anti-inflammatory medications are administered via injection for fast-acting symptom relief.

When nonsurgical treatment options do not improve symptoms, our Orthopedic Spine Specialist may recommend a minimally invasive surgical procedure. The following spine surgeries are commonly performed:

-Portions of a disc that are pinching a nerve are removed.

-Decompression – Direct opening of the canal where the nerve travels.

-Disc replacement surgery. A diseased or damaged disc is removed and then replaced.

The benefits of minimally invasive spine surgery include less time in surgery, less postoperative recovery time, a quicker return to normal activities, and minimal scarring.

 

Seeking Treatment for a Pinched Nerve

Patients who are experiencing the symptoms of a pinched nerve are encouraged to contact any of our 5 Fairfield County offices and make an appointment with one of our Spine Specialists. The road to complete symptom relief starts when you walk through our doors.


Spine Conditions 101: Vertebral Osteoarthritis

(Posted on: December 20, 2017)

Osteoarthritis is a disease characterized by the wear and tear of bones and soft tissues and any joint in the body can be affected by osteoarthritis. When osteoarthritis affects the vertebrae of the spine, the condition is referred to as vertebral osteoarthritis. Vertebral osteoarthritis may present in various stages that may or may not produce symptoms.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, our awarded Orthopedic Spine Specialists have  5 locations throughout Fairfield County, CT and are experts in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of spine conditions.

 

Description and Symptoms of Vertebral Osteoarthritis

 The cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back) regions of the spine are those that are most often affected by osteoarthritis. The early stages of osteoarthritis typically only cause mild inflammation of the joints. Moderate to severe stages cause inflammation, swelling, and bone or soft tissue loss. The most severe stage of osteoarthritis involves almost complete loss of connective soft tissue resulting in bone on bone contact that leads to loss of motion and pain.
The most common symptom of vertebral osteoarthritis is neck or lower back pain. Other symptoms that may present include the following:

-Stiffness

-Decreased range of motion

-Pain with movement

-Extremity weakness, numbness, tingling (due to adjacent nerve injury)

In some cases, osteoarthritis that affects the lumbar region may cause sciatica a term meaning a condition characterized by a shooting pain that runs from the buttocks to the back of the thighs and possibly the legs. In order to properly treat vertebral osteoarthritis, an orthopedic spine specialist must first officially diagnose the condition and determine its cause. A specific diagnosis will lead the spine specialist to create an individualized treatment plan.

 

Causes of Vertebral Osteoarthritis

 The most common cause of vertebral osteoarthritis is age. Factors that may put a patient at an increased risk to develop osteoarthritis include the following:

-Obesity

-Inactivity

-Genetics

-Injury

Some medical conditions may also cause osteoarthritis or speed up its progression. This is something that is best discussed with an orthopedic spine specialist.

Trauma due to accident or injury may also cause osteoarthritis. Many patients who develop osteoarthritis early in life are those that experienced a sports injury or fractured bone.

Treatments for Vertebral Osteoarthritis

Early detection of vertebral osteoarthritis is very important. Patients who see an Orthopedic Spine Specialist as soon as they are experiencing symptoms can expect symptom relief. They can also expect the progression of the disease to be slowed down drastically. Most commonly, an Orthopedic Spine Specialist prescribes a combination of the following initial treatment options to treat vertebral osteoarthritis:

-Activity modification

-Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications

-Pain medications

-Physical therapy

-Interventional Procedures (including steroid injections)

Vertebral osteoarthritis that does not respond to nonsurgical treatment options may require surgical intervention. Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) is a new and extremely effective surgical treatment option that reduces or eliminates symptoms in a very short period of time. Some of the most commonly performed MISS procedures include the following:

– Direct or indirect spinal decompression

– Laminectomy

-Spinal fusion

The benefits of MISS include less surgical time, less postoperative pain, a shorter recovery, and a small incision/less noticeable scar.

 

Contacting a Specialist for Vertebral Osteoarthritis

If you are experiencing the symptoms of vertebral osteoarthritis and are looking for a treatment solution, please contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices today to make an appointment with one of our Spine Specialists. Once an official diagnosis is made, a customized treatment plan will be prescribed. You can expect results when you choose The OSM Center.

vertebral osteoarthritis

total knee replacement
Understanding How Is Total Knee Replacement Performed and Recovery

(Posted on: December 20, 2017)

Total knee replacement (TKR) is one of the most popular and effective types of orthopedic surgery. Countless patients who have undergone a TKR have had their pain eliminated and their range of motion restored. If you have heard of TKR as a treatment option and are interested in learning more, this post is for you. It contains all the information you need to know and the resources needed to make an appointment with one of our awarded Orthopedic Specialists who specializes in joint replacement procedures.  We also have 5 locations throughout Fairfield County, CT.

 

What is a Total Knee Replacement?

A TKR is an orthopedic procedure used to replace an osteoarthritic knee joint that is causing pain and limiting motion. The surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. During the procedure, an orthopedic surgeon performs the following steps:

1. Osteoarthritic bone is removed from the above and below the knee

2. Special components are placed in the knee to mimic the normal function of the knee

3. Biological cement is used to secure the components
Once the components are in place and our orthopedic surgeons perform a series of tests to ensure the knee is moving properly, the incision used to perform the surgery is closed using sutures and/or skin staples.

Patients typically stay in the hospital for only a day after their procedure. Pain is controlled and specific measures are taken to completely minimize the risk of infection during this time.

 

What is the Recovery Time for a Total Knee Replacement?

 Patients see their surgeon for their first postoperative appointment two weeks after surgery. At this appointment, skin staples may be removed and physical therapy may be prescribed.

Over the course of twelve weeks, patients work closely with their physical therapist and orthopedic specialist to regain strength and improve range of motion. Pain steadily decreases during this time. Activities are increased/added depending on pain levels and response to therapy. The total recovery time for a TKR depends on many factors. Typically, patients can exercise and return to low impact physical activities twelve weeks after surgery, some even sooner.

 

What Results are Seen Following a Total Knee Replacement?

 TKR is one of the most effective types of orthopedic surgery. Because osteoarthritic bone is removed and replaced with special components, patients no longer feel pain caused by osteoarthritis. Their joint space is restored and their knee range of motion and strength returns. Patients are able to return to work or activities that they love in a relatively short period of time.

How do I Make an Appointment with a Knee Specialist in Connecticut?

 Knee pain should not dictate the way you live your life. If you are experiencing knee pain that does not go away on its own or respond to conservative treatment measures, please do not hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County, CT offices to make an appointment with one of our Orthopedic Knee Specialists.

Every measure will be taken to provide you with an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment plan. The knee pain solution you have always wanted can be found when you see one of our awarded Orthopedic Specialists.


OSM Center Schedules Networking Event in Westport on December 14th

(Posted on: December 4, 2017)

The OSM Center would like to cordially invite all healthcare, fitness and local professionals to join us for an evening of cocktails and networking in our new Westport location on December 14th.

Please see below for RSVP info.

 

 


The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center Adds 3 New Specialists

(Posted on: November 10, 2017)

 

TRUMBULL, CT – NOVEMBER 9TH, 2017 – The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center (The OSM Center) headquartered in Trumbull recently added 3 new physician specialists to its already renowned team of orthopedic, sports medicine and spine specialists.  The OSM Center serves patients throughout Connecticut and has locations in Trumbull, Shelton, Stratford, Fairfield and Westport.

Dr. Nathan Douglass specializes in hand, wrist and elbow surgery and received his M.D. from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Douglass then completed internship, orthopedic surgery residency and served as Chief Orthopedic Resident at Stanford University, Stanford, CA.  Dr. Douglass also completed the Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery Fellowship at Stanford University, training under hand surgeons from the Orthopedic and Plastic Surgery Departments.

Dr. Mohammed Emam is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with an additional subspecialty in Sports Medicine.   His clinical interests also include regenerative medicine treatments such as platelet rich plasma injections for treating various musculoskeletal conditions. After receiving his medical degree from Cairo University, he completed his residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York where he has received the Resident of the Year Award. He then went on to complete fellowship training in non-operative Sports Medicine subspecialty at Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Dr. Bryan Sage specializes in Primary Care and Sports Medicine and performed his residency in Family Medicine at The Stamford Hospital/Columbia University program where he focused his training in Sports Medicine. Dr. Sage is also Board Certified and a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Practice as well as a member of the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. Sage is a team physician for the University of Bridgeport as well as for St. Joseph’s High School in Trumbull, CT.

 

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About The OSM Center

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center uses the collective skills of its exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. Often, that team will consist of outstanding primary care, podiatry, physiatry, chiropractic, physical therapists or other highly qualified members of the OSM team as we strive to address every condition with non-surgical options first. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.

At The OSM Center, we are passionate about athletics and sports medicine. Our staff actively competes in endurance sports like marathons, triathlons as well as golf, tennis and a variety of other sports, so we understand an athlete’s priority to get back in the game quickly. We care for athletes at the highest level of professional, college and high-school sports as well as weekend warriors.


OSM Center Launches Functional Movement Assessment Partnership with InSports Center

(Posted on: October 18, 2017)

 

From Dr. Benjamin Barnes:

I’m here today to introduce an exciting new program for both performance enhancement and injury prevention. The Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center has partnered with InSports in Trumbull and over the course of the past two years we have developed a program tailored to the ever-increasing pandemic of sport injuries.

In an era where sports specialization is at an all time high, we are also seeing an increase in overuse injuries. For an athlete, the biggest limiting factor in their progression is time.  For example, picture an athlete that has a career length of 10 years. Any time that is spent rehabbing and recuperating from an injury could  limit their overall progression.

What we can do with the state of the art software is to capture the athlete in various movements that pertain to their sport/activity. With the data we can objectively analyze this information to detect any potential issues down the road. With this information, we can help to develop a blueprint of recommendations tailored to that athlete.

Most assessment programs are subjective, which means that the person doing the assessments are eyeing the individuals progress.  Using Kinetisense, a state of the art software that can capture angles and the unnatural motions that the naked eye is unable to see we are able to formulate a completely unbiased assessment that can gear a specifically formulated strength and conditioning program to not only prevent injuries, but  potentially improve the athletes performance.

To learn more about this program, or to sign up for an assessment, please contact us!


What Causes Shoulder Instability?

(Posted on: August 24, 2017)

The shoulder is a ball and socket joint made up of the head of the humerus (arm bone) and the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). Because the shoulder joint is the most mobile joint in the body, it’s also the joint that is the most unstable. The following are the three most common causes of shoulder instability:

Rotator Cuff Injuries 

The rotator cuff muscles and tendons hold the shoulder in place and help move it. The rotator cuff is the major dynamic stabilizer of the shoulder joint. Age and/or injury can partially or completely tear the rotator cuff tendons and cause shoulder instability. When the rotator cuff tendons are torn, the head of the humerus loosely fits in the glenoid cavity. Movement can cause a partial dislocation (subluxation) or complete dislocation. In many cases, physical therapy can be used to strengthen an injured rotator cuff and improve shoulder instability. A rotator cuff that is completely torn may require surgical intervention in the form of a rotator cuff repair.

Illustration 1- The muscles and tendons of the rotator cuff

Labrum Injuries

An outer rim of cartilage known as the labrum surrounds the glenoid cavity (shoulder socket). A healthy labrum allows the head of the humerus to sit perfectly in the glenoid cavity. It is considered one of the primary static shoulder stabilizing structures. A partially or completely torn labrum allows the head of the humerus to move in and out of the cavity. Like rotator cuff tears, labral tears are caused by age and/or injury. The degree of shoulder instability corresponds to the severity of the tear. Small tears may be treated non-surgically. Large, complete tears may require surgical intervention. The most common labral injuries that require surgical intervention are a superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and a Bankart tears.

Illustration 2- A partially torn labrum

Repetitive Strain

Many patients are born with loose shoulder ligaments. When overhead sports and/or activities are performed, the ligaments are stretched and shoulder instability may develop. The best way to treat shoulder instability caused by loose ligaments and repetitive strain is by using physical therapy to strengthen the surrounding structures, including the shoulder muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Seeking Treatment

If shoulder instability is affecting the way you live your life, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment with one of our orthopedic shoulder specialists. Regardless of the cause of your shoulder instability, we’ll have a treatment option that’s right for you. You can expect results when you choose our experts.


5 Activities That Can Cause Neck Pain

(Posted on: August 24, 2017)

Acute neck pain is defined as neck pain that lasts less than four weeks. It’s typically caused by minor neck muscle and ligament injuries. A strain occurs when the neck muscle fibers are damaged or torn. A sprain occurs when the neck ligaments are overstretched. The following are five activities that can cause a strain and/or sprain that produces acute neck pain:

  1. Prolonged computer and/or phone Use. Looking at a computer or phone requires a user to lean forward and bend at the neck. When this position is maintained for a prolonged period of time, neck muscles and ligaments are stressed and an injury can easily occur. To avoid this, users are advised to sit up straight and take frequent breaks that involve standing up and walking around or changing of positions.

 

  1. Sleeping with the neck turned, twisted, or bent can stretch muscles and ligaments. If a sleeping individual doesn’t change the above-mentioned positions, acute neck pain may result. A comfortable pillow and mattress can be used to help improve neck position while sleeping.

 

  1. Constant overhead movements made while painting can overstretch the shoulder and neck muscles. A strain or sprain can occur if someone who’s painting doesn’t take frequent breaks and stretch properly.

 

  1. Overhead weightlifting. Lifting weights too frequently or lifting weights that are too heavy increases the risk of a neck muscle or ligament injury. Weight lifters should always warm up properly and be cognizant of proper lifting techniques.

 

  1. Impact sports. Football and soccer players are the athletes who are most at risk to sustain a neck injury. In order to prevent injury, these athletes should practice and play their sport using proper form. They should also stretch frequently and warm up properly.

 

If you sustain an injury or if you have neck pain that worsens in severity, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment with one of our spine specialists.

Diagnosing and treating your condition as soon as possible will help ensure a quick recovery and return to a normal, pain-free life.


Rheumatoid arthritis
What is Rheumatoid Arthritis and How is It Treated?

(Posted on: August 24, 2017)

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the body mistakenly mounts an immune attack against its own joints and connective tissues. RA can occur in any joint in the body, but most frequently occurs in those of the hands, feet, wrists, and knees. When left untreated, inflammation caused by RA can damage the cartilage and bone of the affected joint and cause the narrowing of the joint space and probable bone damage.

Causes of Rheumatoid Arthritis

The exact cause of RA is unknown. It’s suggested that hereditary, hormonal, and environmental factors may all play a role in the development and progression of the disease.

Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Initially, patients with RA may not present with symptoms. As the disease progresses, the following symptoms are commonly seen:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Tenderness
  • Stiffness, especially in the morning.
  • Visible joint deformities

Additionally, fatigue, loss of appetite, and fever may present. One of the keys to effectively treating RA is an early diagnosis.

DiagnosingRheumatoid Arthritis

An orthopedic or sports medicine specialist can help to differentiate between the different types of arthritis and develop a proper treatment plan. The first step in an accurate diagnosis involves the taking of a detailed medical history that includes symptoms, medical conditions, and prior injuries. The second step involves a thorough examination of joint affected by RA. Finally, a blood test for antibodies linked to RA and medical imaging studies (x-rays, MRIs, ultrasounds) to view the joint are ordered. After an official diagnosis is made, a treatment plan can be decided upon.

Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA is a chronic disease that cannot be cured. The best way to treat RA is to manage its symptoms and prevent its progression. Many medications can be used. They include the following:

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Medications that decrease inflammation and pain associated with RA.
  2. Fast acting anti-inflammatory medications that can be injected into the affected joint or taken orally.
  3. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Medications that slow down the progression of the disease by modifying its course.
  4. Medications that decrease or stop an immune response by controlling steps in the inflammatory process.
  5. JAK inhibitors. Medications that inhibit an immune response.

When RA (or other arthridities) doesn’t respond to nonsurgical treatment and joint mobility and function are impaired, a joint replacement surgery may be considered.

Seeking Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis

If you’re experiencing joint pain that won’t go away or if you’ve been diagnosed with RA and are looking for a treatment solution, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to make an appointment with one of our orthopedic specialists.


Is It My Back or Hip That’s Causing Pain?

(Posted on: July 10, 2017)

Is it my back or hip that’s causing pain?”—is very common question.

If you’re in pain, you certainly want to know where it’s coming from. Because back pain can also radiate into the hip and buttocks, many patients are unsure of what is causing their pain – and how to treat it.  So, here’s everything you need to know:

How to Tell If Your Pain is Caused by a Hip Problem

 The following are the most common hip problems and their associated symptoms:

  1. Generalized hip joint pain. Pain that originates in the hip joint usually presents as groin pain, on one or both sides, that may or may not travel to the inner thigh, the front of the leg, and knee.
  2. Hip arthritis. The distinguishing symptom of hip arthritis is limited joint mobility. Patients with moderate to severe arthritis have a hard time standing up. Also, the range of motion in the joint may be decreased. This also presents as difficulty putting on shoes or socks and getting out of the car.
  3. Hip bursitis. Pain on the side of the hip is usually caused by hip bursitis—a condition where the joint lining, fluid-filled sacs, known as bursae, are inflamed.

 Once symptoms are recognized, an orthopedic and sports medicine specialist can order diagnostic tests, such as x-rays, ultrasound or MRI, to confirm a diagnosis.

 

How to Tell If Your Pain is Caused by a Back Problem

 Some common back problems and their associated symptoms are:

  1. Generalized lower back pain (LBP). Pain in the lower back is always a symptom of LBP. Also, a shooting pain, known as sciatica (leg pain coming from the back), may be felt in the buttocks, back of the thigh, and down the leg.
  2. A herniated disc. A herniated disc causes pain by pressing on a nerve which will generate pain in the buttocks and down through the leg. Fatigue, weakness, and varying degrees of sciatica are also usually felt.
  3. Spinal stenosis. The narrowing of the spinal canal, due to injury or aging, creates a narrowing around the spinal cord in a condition known as spinal stenosis. Key distinguishing symptoms include: leg pain and fatigue associated with prolonged standing, walking, and/or running. Usually, pain caused by spinal stenosis gets better when patients sit, lay down or flex forward.

 

Diagnostic tests that correlate with symptom findings confirm the presence of these injuries/conditions.

How to Get Rid of Your Pain


If you have pain that caused by your back or hip, or are unsure of where the pain is coming from,  we have a solution for you. Our team of Orthopedic Surgeons and Spine Specialists are experts in diagnosing and treating all injuries of the spine and hip. When you’re ready, please don’t hesitate to contact us to arrange an appointment.


Is It My Shoulder or My Neck That’s Causing Pain?

(Posted on: July 10, 2017)

Referred pain is pain that the body can not trace to an exact source. Patients who suffer from such pain are often frustrated—not knowing where their pain is truly coming from means they can’t treat their symptoms. Perhaps one of the best examples of this type of situation occurs in patients who have shoulder and/or neck pain.  If you’re one of these patients, here’s how to tell what’s causing your pain:

When Pain is Caused by The Shoulder

 The three most common shoulder injuries are:

  1. Rotator cuff tears. The rotator cuff consists of a group of muscles and tendons that rotate and stabilize the shoulder. The cuff may be torn while performing overhead arm movements or because tendons have weakened and worn with age.
  2. Labrum tears. The glenoid labrum is a ring of cartilage that holds the head of the humerus in the glenoid cavity of the scapula. Like the rotator cuff, it may be torn while performing overhead arm movements.
  3. Overuse can cause the joint lining fluid-filled sacs, known as bursae, to become irritated and inflamed.

The most common symptoms of these injuries are:

  • A dull, achy pain in the shoulder or outside of the upper arm
  • Pain that occurs when raising the arm overhead
  • Pain that occurs when reaching behind the back
  • Pain that radiates into the upper arm, but not the elbow
  • Shoulder instability

The presence of these symptoms, findings of an orthopedic sports medicine specialist’s clinical exam, and diagnostic test results are needed to definitively diagnosis shoulder injuries.

 

When Pain is Caused by The Neck

 Neck pain is typically caused by damage to one of the joints, vertebrae and/or impingement of the spinal nerves. If you think your neck is causing your pain, look for the following symptoms:

  • Burning, tingling, and/or numbness in the arm, elbow, hand, and/or fingers
  • Pain that radiates down the side of the neck and into the shoulder blade
  • Pain that occurs when twisting and/or flexing the neck
  • Pain that decreases when the neck is supported by a brace or pillow

In order to receive a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan outlined of a neck injury/condition, an Orthopedic and Spine Specialist should be consulted.

 

Treating Your Pain

 If you’re in pain, please don’t hesitate to contact our offices to arrange an appointment with one of our sports medicine specialists. Once an accurate diagnosis has been made, a treatment plan that’s right for you will be created. Expect a full recovery and return to a symptom-free life when you chose our practice.

 

 

 

 

 


3 Common Leg and Knee Injuries Found in Long Distance Runners

(Posted on: July 10, 2017)

One of the most important thing long distance runners can do to ensure they keep running is take care of their knees. But that’s easier said than done. Because of the constant foot to ground impact during long distance runs, most athletes will experience a knee injury at some point in their career. Here is all the information you need to know about the three most common:

 

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)

 

Related anatomy. The knee joint is made up of three bones: the femur, tibia, and patella. These bones are connected to one another by strong soft tissues called ligaments and tendons. Runner’s knee is said to occur when the ligaments and/or tendons that attach to the patella become irritated, aggravated, and/or inflamed.

 

Causes. There are two main causes of runner’s knee. The first, and most obvious, is overuse. The second is a patellar misalignment.

 

Symptoms and treatments. A dull, aching pain is associated with runner’s knee. This pain may limit or sideline athletes but is usually easily treatable. Conservative treatment options, such as rest, ice, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, decrease inflammation and help injured athletes quickly recover. Physical therapy and other active exercises focused on developing strength is also very helpful in treating this painful condition.

 

Prevention. Once runner’s knee has been effectively treated, injury prevention measures should be taken. Athletes should avoid increasing the intensity or duration of their workouts too quickly, and wear a knee brace if necessary.

 

Meniscus Tears

 

Related anatomy. The meniscus sits between the femur and tibia and acts as a “shock absorber”—cushioning the bones during impact while walking and running.

 

Causes. Meniscus tears are caused by sudden twisting and turning movements while running. In many cases, a runner who sustains a meniscus tear had weak or damaged cartilage prior to the injury.

 

Symptoms. The first presenting symptom is a “pop” heard when the meniscus is torn. Other symptoms that can quickly follow are pain, stiffness, swelling, catching, and locking. Additionally, injured athletes often state that they feel their knee is going to “give out”.

 

Treatments. Non-conservative treatment options, such as rest, ice, medications, and physical therapy, are always tried first.

 

When they aren’t effective, surgical intervention might be necessary, where potentially the meniscus is repaired, or removed based on location and severity of the injury.

 

Shin Splints

 

Related anatomy, causes, symptoms. When the muscles that attach to the inner portion of the tibia are overused, they become inflamed and cause mild to severe pain in a condition known as shin splints.

 

Treatments. Treating mild to moderate shin splints is relatively easy—rest, ice and anti-inflammatory medications help injured athletes return quickly, if not immediately. Treating severe shin splints can be a bit more difficult. Often, immobilization in a walking boot is necessary. Downtime can be anywhere between a few days to weeks.

 

Seeking Treatment

 

If you’ve injured your knee and it’s limiting your running, please contact our office to arrange an appointment with one of our Orthopedic or Sports Medicine Specialists. After an accurate diagnosis has been made, a personal treatment plan will be prescribed. You can expect to be back running very soon when under the care of our specialists.

runners knee

Physical Therapy as an Effective Treatment Option for Back Pain

(Posted on: July 10, 2017)

Rest, medication, and surgery aren’t the only ways to decrease back pain. In fact, more spine specialists than ever are prescribing physical therapy for their patients as a first line treatment. If you’re in pain and are interested in physical therapy, here’s everything you need to know:

The Goals of Physical Therapy 

A physical therapy program for back pain seeks to accomplish three goals:

  1. Decrease pain
  2. Improve function
  3. Increase patient knowledge and awareness
  4. Promote strength and endurance of the back muscles

A Physical Therapist will create and implement a comprehensive plan that includes a variety of passive treatments and active exercises.

 

Passive Treatment Modalities

 Passive physical therapy refers to treatment that’s done to the patient. The most common passive treatment modalities for back pain are:

  1. Heat Therapy. Heating pads relax the back muscles, ligaments, and tendons. This decreases the frequency and severity of pain-producing muscle spasms.
  2. Cold Therapy. Ice packs are placed directly on painful areas to decrease pain and inflammation.
  3. A nerve stimulator unit helps decrease pain by blocking pain signals sent to the brain.
  4. Ultrasound therapy. An ultrasound machine sends pain relieving sound waves deep into soft tissues and muscles.

Depending on the Physical Therapist, numerous other modalities can be used. A new and popular one is dry needling.

Active Exercises

Active exercises are divided into two categories:

  1. Stretching exercises. When the lower back, abdomen, and hamstring muscles are properly stretched, patients see a decrease in pain due to an increase in flexibility and mobility. Doing simple movements becomes easier and less painful.
  2. Strengthening exercises. Improving lower back, pelvic and core strength decreases pain by improving stability and posture. This serves to create a natural “brace” for your back.

In some situations, a Physical Therapist might use low impact aerobic activity as an active exercise. This type of activity has the added benefit of helping overweight patients lose fat and increase muscle mass.

 

Seeking Treatment

 If you’re in pain and want to know if physical therapy can improve your condition, please contact our offices to arrange an appointment with one of our specialists. Once your condition is accurately diagnosed, a treatment plan that is right for you will be prescribed. Physical therapy will be a part of the plan if it can help your condition. You can expect pain relief when you choose our practice.

 

 

 


Care for Hips and Knees: American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guidelines

(Posted on: June 28, 2017)

 

Whether you are just starting to experience pain and loss of mobility in your hips or knees, you have been treating the pain for some time, you are about to undergo surgery, or you are recovering from a total joint replacement, we have information to help you make informed decisions about your care.

The AAHKS Patient Education Committee, comprised of orthopaedic surgeons who practice hip and knee surgery, have developed these materials for you. Use them to educate yourself and to generate questions that you can ask your physician.


osm center 2017 scholarship
THE OSM CENTER ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS

(Posted on: June 19, 2017)

JUNE 19, 2017 – TRUMBULL, CTThe Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM Foundation Inc.) of Trumbull recently announced the winners of their annual scholarships. The awards were given to high school scholar athletes planning to attend college this fall.  OSM offers these scholarships to outstanding high school seniors who excel in three areas: student athletic achievements, academic accomplishments and community service. The scholarship is open to high schools where OSM serves as team physicians and include: Trumbull High School, St. Joseph High School, Masuk High School, Warren Harding High School, Central High School, Notre Dame High School and Bassick High School.

“Assisting the student athlete to move toward their goal is very rewarding, said OSM Orthopedic Surgeon Michael Redler, MD. “Our practice is proud to follow these students throughout their high school athletic careers and to serve as their team physicians. This program keeps us connected to the community we serve”

The winners of this year’s scholarships were Patrick Lazzaro (Masuk High School), Jack Morrissey (St. Joseph), Jenny Goldstein (Notre Dame High School), Britney Galloza (Bassick High School), Anush Sureshbabu (Trumbull High School) and Madelyne Medina (Central High/Fairchild Wheeler High School), Asha-Layla Robinson (Central High School).

 

osm center 2017 scholarship

Photo: The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull’s Physicians and this year’s scholarship winners. Standing Back Row (l-r): Mark E. Wilchinsky, M.D., Peter S. Boone, M.D, and Gerard J. Girasole, M.D.  Winners: (l-r) Anush Sureshbabu, Madelyne Medina, Britney Galloza, Patrick Lazzaro, Asha-Layla Robinson, Jack Morrissey, (not present) Jenny Goldstein.

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About The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center

OSM surgeons specialize in all aspects of bone and joint surgery as well as sports medicine and orthopedic surgery. The practice consists of two chiropractors, a podiatrist, two physiatrists, physician assistants, and athletic trainers. OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Stratford, and

Shelton as well as The OSM Therapy Centers in Trumbull, Fairfield and Shelton.

OSM includes orthopedic surgeons Michael R. Redler, MD; Peter S. Boone, MD; Gerard J. Girasole, MD; David J. Martin, MD; James I. Spak, MD; Daniel E. Weiland, MD; Mark E. Wilchinsky, MD. In addition, Isaac Cohen, MD; Michelle Pagliaro Haywood, DC; Gene Tekmyster, DO; Alan F. Feldman, DPM; Benjamin G. Barnes, DC, Marissa M. Smith, MD; Rolando L. Lopez, PA-C, John M. Carravone, PA-C, Michael J. Hann, PA-C, Raymond Sheehan, PA-C and Kate Nadler, ATC, Sports Medicine Coordinator.

Their website is www.osmcenter.com.


Treating Damaged Knee Cartilage

(Posted on: June 6, 2017)

The knee joint is composed of the femur, tibia and patella bones and its primary action is to flex and extend the lower leg while walking and running. Because this important action controls daily life, protecting the integrity of the joint is of the utmost importance. One of the key protective elements of the knee is cartilage. It should be taken special care of throughout one’s lifetime.

Knee Cartilage Defined 

Cartilage is a special type of elastic tissue that coats the ends of all bones of the body. In the knee, cartilage can be found on the ends of the femur (like a cap), back of the patella, and on top of the tibia. When healthy, knee cartilage allows the joint to move smoothly and serves as a stabilizer and shock absorber—bracing the load placed on the joint when the foot impacts the ground and keeping the knee from excess movement.

Illustration 1- The cartilage  of a normal knee is highlighted in  purple

 

Because the knee experiences a great deal of use over the course of a lifetime, cartilage is susceptible to damage.

How Knee Cartilage is Damaged

Cartilage can be damaged in two ways:

The first relates to overuse due to participation in athletics or physical activity and overloading the joint. When twisting, turning, and torqueing the knee, cartilage can be partially or completely torn. This type of injury can cause bone on bone rubbing, which can limit the injured athlete. This usually involves an acute injury on top of pre-existing damage.

The second relates to the development of osteoarthritis, a disease that causes inflammation, and leads to destruction of the cartilage. As the disease develops in aging individuals, a host of unpleasant symptoms, namely pain, swelling, and weakness, can decrease quality of life and ability to function.

Illustration 2- Cartilage that has been affected by osteoarthritis

Protecting Knee Cartilage

There are numerous ways to protect cartilage from injury and arthritis. Four great ones are:

  1. Proper warm-up, stretching and strengthening all the muscles of the leg.
  2. Using proper form when participating in athletics.
  3. Avoiding overtraining.
  4. Seeing an orthopedic sports medicine specialist when symptomatic or injured.

Preventing knee cartilage damage is an important part of maintaining one’s overall health. When taken care of, there’s no reason why cartilage can’t last a lifetime.

What to Do If You’re in Pain or Injured

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine specialists are the most qualified medical professionals to take care of cartilage injuries. Their education, skills, and experience allow them to accurately diagnose and effectively treat injuries so patients can return to a normal life.

If you’re in pain or have sustained an injury, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment—we will get you in ASAP.

 


total hip replacement
How Do I Know When It’s Time for a Total Hip Replacement?

(Posted on: June 6, 2017)

Total hip replacement (THR) surgery helps thousands of patients every year. Because it’s an elective procedure, the decision to undergo surgery is entirely up to the patient. Which raises the question:

How do I know when it’s time?

 A THR is indicated for patients who suffer from severe, symptom-producing hip arthritis that doesn’t respond to non-surgical treatment. Four signs that it’s time to have a THR are:

  1. Groin Pain. The development of groin pain is a sign that hip arthritis has reached the point where a replacement can be necessary. Once groin pain presents, many patients have difficulty walking, even standing. This is one of the most limiting symptoms of hip arthritis and a sure-fire sign that a replacement is likely.
  2. Inability to perform day-to-day activities. Once patients can no longer perform daily activities necessary to live a happy, functional life, it’s a good time to get a replacement. Walking, getting dressed, and going to the bathroom are the three most important activities that patients should be able to do on their own.
  3. Arthritis has reached the point where it’s bone-on-bone. X-rays read by an orthopedic specialist that show bone-on-bone rubbing can be a strong indicator that its time for a replacement, in combination with limiting symptoms due to the arthritis.
  4. Inability to sleep. Pain that wakes or keeps patients up throughout the night can be resolved once the arthritic hip is replaced.

When making their final decision, patient should keep any, all, or any combination of these four signs in mind. They should also always seek the expert advice and opinion of an orthopedic specialist. Their education, knowledge, and experience allow them to steer patients in the right direction during the decision-making process.

Seeking Treatment

 A THR is a 2-3 hour procedure done under general anesthesia. Patients are usually allowed to return home following a 2-3-night hospital stay.   However, some patients can even go home the same day!

Recovery is physical therapy can take 6-8 months for complete recovery. Results are remarkable—some of the best in all of orthopedic surgery.

When you’re ready to talk to one of our orthopedic specialists about your hip condition, please don’t hesitate to give contact one of our 5 Fairfield County locations. The road to a pain-free, functional life starts when you walk through our doors.


Pain Management 101: Defining Chronic Pain

(Posted on: June 6, 2017)

Chronic pain can be defined as pain that persists, despite rest and conservative treatment, for several weeks. Because pain is an individualized sensation, there’s no definitive diagnostic test for chronic pain. For this reason, it’s important that pain suffers have a strong understanding of what chronic pain is (and isn’t), so they can help physicians accurately diagnose and treat their unique condition and the source of the pain.

Understanding Chronic Pain

 Pain is the body’s way of saying “something is wrong,” it is there to modulate a change in behavior. It can be caused by a medical condition, accident/injury, or, in unique situations, or by normal age related degeneration of skeletal components. In most cases, pain is acute. But, sometimes pain can linger for weeks, even months. This type of chronic pain can present in many ways are is usually due to the body’s inability to heal the original acute injury.

Symptoms of Chronic Pain

Symptoms of chronic pain are very varied and individualized in regards to type, severity, and consistency. It can present as any or any combination of the following:

-Burning

-Tingling

-Numbness

-Shocking

-Dull aching

-Stabbing

-Sharp sensations

These symptoms can, and usually do, cause a host of other unpleasant symptoms, including:

-Confusion

-Anxiety

-Depression

-Nausea

-Fatigue

-Sleep disturbance

Chronic pain can lead to changes in behavior and will affect everyday function.

Treating Chronic Pain

 The taking of a detailed medical and pain history is the first, and maybe most important, step in effectively treating chronic pain. Once a physician has a clear picture of how the patient is experiencing pain and identify the source, they can start treatment options, which can include:

-Nerve blocks

-Injections

-Electrical stimulation

-Physical therapy

And more. Because pain management is an evolving field, new, effective treatment options exist and are used. Each patient’s condition and treatment program are unique.

Seeking Treatment

If you’re suffering from chronic pain, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices. We’re currently accepting new patients and will get you in ASAP. One of our specialists will take the time to get to know and understand your situation/condition. When in the right hands, a return to a pain-free life is entirely possible.

chronic pain

The Most Common Labrum Tear Sustained by Throwing Athletes

(Posted on: June 6, 2017)

The shoulder is the most mobile but one of the least stable joints in the body. Because it’s used repetitively by throwing athletes, special attention should be paid to maintaining its strength, health, and function. In order to prevent injuries, it’s important that athletes educate themselves. One of the most common injuries sustained by throwing athletes is a SLAP tear of the soft tissue, known as the labrum, that helps hold the shoulder in place.

Illustration 1- A SLAP tear

SLAP Tears

 A SLAP (superior labrum anterior and posterior) tear is a serious injury that sidelines athletes for an extended period of time. In some cases, it can be treated with physical therapy. However, in most, it requires surgical intervention. Recovery is physical therapy intensive and full recovery can take 8-12 months.

Causes of a Labrum Tear

The injury usually occurs during the ‘follow-through phase’ of the throwing motion. After the athlete releases the ball, stress is placed on the shoulder as it quickly decelerates. If the muscles of the shoulder are weak, due to muscle imbalance or overuse, the shoulder can dislocate, tearing the labrum. The labrum can be described as a suction cup keeping the Humerus in the cup of the joint. Significant tension and forces can cause the labrum to tear.

Illustration 2- SLAP tears usually occur during the follow through (fourth picture) of the throwing motion

Signs and Symptoms of a Labrum Tear

The following signs might be indicative of a SLAP tear:

-Locking, catching, popping, and/or grinding of the shoulder

-Inability to effectively throw

-A shoulder dislocation

-Decreased range of motion

Common symptoms include:

-Pain

-Severe weakness

-Joint laxity

-Swelling and numbness can also occur.

Diagnosis of a Labrum Tear

Orthopedic sports medicine specialists are the most qualified medical professionals to diagnose SLAP tears. Their diagnostic process usually includes:

  1. Taking a detailed medical history. Determining how and why the injury occurred provides diagnostic clues.
  2. Performing a thorough physical exam. Symptoms that present with certain movements or positions helps diagnose the injury.
  3. Analyzing medical imaging studies. X-rays, Ultrasound and MRIs help confirm the diagnosis.

Once a patient has been diagnosed with a SLAP tear, a treatment plan is made.

Treatment for a Labrum Tear

 As previously mentioned, SLAP tears are usually treated using surgical intervention. During the procedure, the specialist locates the tear and then repairs it using anchors that reattach the labrum to the bone. The procedure usually takes 1-2 hours and is done on an outpatient basis and often can be done arthroscopically through three very small incisions.

Seeking Treatment for a Labrum Tear

Athletes should never play with an injury. If your shoulder hurts or you can relate to the information in this post, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to schedule an appointment with one of our specialists. We’ll get you back on the field ASAP!


3 Treatments for Chronic Pain

(Posted on: June 6, 2017)

Patients who experience pain for three or more weeks are said to suffer from chronic pain. Because this type of pain can vary in form, severity and frequency, treatment plans are individualized. Pain management is an ever-evolving field and new treatment options are constantly emerging. This can benefit patients who fail to respond to conventional treatment. Or, can be used in combination with conventional treatment options. The choice regarding how the following three new treatment options for chronic pain are used is entirely up to you and your  Pain Management Specialist.

Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA)

RFA is a minimally invasive procedure that can be done under local anesthesia for chronic or long standing low back pain that has not responded to other treatments. During the procedure, the physician places a tiny needle near nerves that send pain signals to the brain. Once the needle has been properly placed, heat, in the form of radiofrequency waves, is administered and pain impulses to the brain cease. When necessary, treatments can be given in yearly increments.

Spinal Injections

Medications can be be delivered directly to problematic areas of the spine to treat the cause of symptoms. A combination of anesthetic and steroid medications is used to decrease pain and inflammation. Effects from spinal injections can bring relief to those with long standing pain and can facilitate the natural regenerative and healing properties of your body. Sometimes the injections can even lead to complete resolution of symptoms, and if pain returns they can often be repeated.

Therapy

Physical and cognitive therapy can be an important component of an effective pain treatment program.  Specialty trained physicians and Physical Therapists are specially trained to help patients recognize and deal with pain. During individual therapy sessions, patients gain the knowledge and experience needed to help them cope with the pain they’re experiencing. They can also receive treatment in the form of massage, ice, heat, and electrical stimulation, stretching and exercise, all to help relieve the symptoms.

Seeking Treatment

 If you’re experiencing chronic pain, you shouldn’t have to suffer. There are numerous treatment options that can help your condition. The key is knowing which one(s) to choose. To arrange an appointment with one of our Pain Management Specialists, please contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices today!

pain management

Femoroacetabular Impingement in Athletes

(Posted on: May 17, 2017)

-Written by Daniel Weiland, MD

What is Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)?

 

hip joint

The hip is what is known as a ball and socket joint.  The femoral head (or ball) sits in the acetabulum (socket) which is deepened by a cartilage cuff called the labrum.  FAI occurs when the ball rubs abnormally on the socket, impinging the labrum.  FAI can also damage the articular cartilage, or the smooth cartilage that lines and protects the ends of bones during weight bearing. A majority of time, FAI happens on both sides of the joint.

Types of FAI

CAM Type FAI

CAM FAI occurs when the femoral head and neck are not perfectly round (Figure 1).  This causes abnormal contact between the femoral head and the acetabulum. This leads to a shearing force on the articular cartilage which may damage it. CAM FAI usually leaves the labrum intact (Figure 2).

Figure 1

Figure 2

Pincer Type FAI

This is caused by a bony overgrowth of the acetabular rim.  It leads to the labrum being crushed between the excess bone of the acetabulum and the femoral head.  Pincer type FAI is demonstrated in Figure 3 by what is known as cross over sign. The edge of the anterior wall of the acetabulum (blue line) is medial (inside) to the edge of posterior wall (red line) in the bottom segment of the hip, but in the top segment, this relationship reverses. Cross over sign is an indicator of acetabular retroversion.  This basically means the socket sits too far forward, i.e. it over-covers, the head of the femur. The femoral head and neck prematurely contact the acetabulum during flexion and rotation (Figure 4.).  This can cause tears, usually in the front portion of the labrum or degeneration of the labrum.  In Pincer type FAI the articular cartilage is usually unharmed.

Figure 3

Figure 4

Symptoms of FAI

-Deep pain in the groin

-Continuous dull, aching pain in the hip with occasional sharp, shooting pain

-Increased pain with sitting for prolonged periods of time

-Usually insidious(gradual) onset of pain

-Pain with deep hip flexion and/or internal rotation

Treatment of FAI

In some cases, individuals may overcome FAI with activity modification, medication, and physical therapy.  When conservative treatment fails, other options must be considered.  A steroid injection with anesthetic can be both diagnostic and therapeutic. The injection is diagnostic in the sense that if there is immediate relief then it verifies the hip joint is the exact structure causing the problem.  It is also therapeutic in the sense that it can give relief of symptoms for an indeterminable amount of time.  A steroid injection may work for only a few days, or it can last forever.  Each patient has a different outcome.

When all other forms of treatment fail, hip arthroscopy must be considered.  Surgical intervention addresses repair of the labrum as well as any articular cartilage damage and bony abnormalities. Hip arthroscopies are outpatient surgeries.

No formal incision is made, only portals to allow for the surgical instrumentation.  Many patients return to normal activity by six weeks, although full recovery may take up to six months. However, in cases where arthritis is already present in the joint, arthroscopy is no longer of any benefit.  These patients ultimately require joint replacement if conservative measures fail and they can no longer tolerate the discomfort.


THE OSM CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES

(Posted on: May 10, 2017)

Release Date:  February 15, 2017

Contact:   Lisa Jaser, (203) 268-2882, LJaser@osmcenter.com

THE ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES.

 The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull is accepting applications for a $2,000.00 scholarship and several additional scholarships.  The scholarship is open to high school athletes planning to attend college in the fall of 2017.

OSM is looking for outstanding high school seniors who excel in three areas: student athletic achievements, academic accomplishments and community service.  The scholarship is open to high schools where OSM serves as team physicians: Bassick, Central, Masuk, Notre Dame, St. Joseph, Trumbull, and Warren Harding.

“We take great pride in our student athletes as they move toward their goals. OSM is proud to see these students throughout their high school careers as they achieve excellence in athletics, in the community and academically. It is with great pleasure that we serve as team physicians, as this keeps us closely connected to the community we serve,” said OSM Orthopaedic Surgeon Michael Redler, MD.

Interested students must complete the application, which is available from their high school guidance department or athletic director. The application may also be downloaded from OSM’s website, www.osmcenter.com.

Applications must be submitted by Friday, May 19, 2017 to Lisa Jaser, Director of Human Resources, at The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center, 888 White Plains Rd., Trumbull, CT 06611.  OSM will select winners in June 2017.

OSM includes orthopaedic surgeons:  Michael R. Redler, M.D., Peter S. Boone, M.D., Gerard J. Girasole, M.D., David J. Martin, M.D., James I. Spak, M.D., Daniel E. Weiland, M.D., and Mark E. Wilchinsky, M.D. In addition: Isaac Cohen, M.D., Gene Tekmyster, D.O., Marissa M. Smith, M.D., M.S., Michelle Pagliaro Haywood, D.C., Benjamin G. Barnes, D.C., Alan H. Feldman, D.P.M., Rolando R. Lopez, PA-C, Carrie A. Rossi, PA-C, John M. Carravone, PA-C, Michael J. Hann, PA-C, Kaitlyn A. Nadler, AT-C.

OSM surgeons specialize in all aspects of bone and joint surgery as well as sports medicine and spine surgery. The team consists of chiropractors, a podiatrist, physiatrists, physician assistants, and athletic trainers.

OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Shelton, Stratford, and Westport as well as The OSM Therapy Centers in Trumbull, Fairfield, and Shelton.

OSM now offers a walk-in clinic OSMSTAT at their Trumbull and Westport locations for your urgent orthopaedic needs.  Their website is www.osmstat.com.

CLICK HERE TO FILL OUT THE APPLICATION


The Different Types of Meniscus Tears (And How They’re Treated)

(Posted on: May 2, 2017)

The meniscus functions as the shock absorbers and stabilizers in the knee by forming two wedges of cartilage between the three bones in the knee. Meniscus tears are one of the most common sports-related knee injuries. While most people have heard of them, they don’t know exactly what they are or how they’re treated. In order to learn more, let’s talk about how orthopedic surgeons classify and treat meniscus tears.

Classifying Meniscus Tears

 

The meniscus is divided into two regions:

The red zone refers to the outer third of the meniscus. The term red is used to signify that this zone receives an adequate amount of blood supply. Thus, meniscus tears in this zone can sometimes heal without surgery.

The white zone refers to the inner two-thirds of the meniscus. Unlike the red zone, receives very little blood supply and tears in this area are unlikely to heal. Tears in the white zone usually require some form of surgery.

Illustration 1– There can be some overlap in meniscal zones. The red-red and red-white zones receive the most amount of blood.

 

Meniscus tears can occur medially or laterally (inside or outside) in the red zone, white zone, or in both. There are four types of tears:

 

  1. A longitudinal tear occurs in the red zone along the outer rim.

 

  1. A bucket handle tear is a vertical tear that can occur in either zone. This type of tear resembles a “bucket handle” and can flip, or fold, backward to disturb the integrity of the knee joint. This can sometimes be appreciated by “clicking” or “locking” of the knee when bending.

 

  1. A transverse tear is a tear extending across both zones.

 

  1. An anterior or posterior horn tear refers to a tear of the end of the meniscus.

Illustration 2- Three of the four types of meniscus tears. A flap and bucket handle tear can be considered one in the same.

Treatment options are always dependent on the type of meniscus tear, location of the tear, functional limitations caused by the pain and the recommendation of an orthopedic surgeon.

 

Treating Meniscus Tears

As previously mentioned, the zone that the tear occurs in plays an important role in treatment.

Non-surgical treatment options are generally used for white zone tears and include:

-Rest

-Activity modification

-Physical therapy

-Bracing

-PRP Injections

 

Significant tears, or those extending across both zones usually require arthroscopic surgery in the form of a:

 

  1. The part of the meniscus that is torn is removed.

Illustration 3- The torn meniscus is removed

  1. Meniscus repair. Suturing or stitching is used to reattach torn pieces and restore the meniscus.

 

The type of surgery performed is based on an examination of the meniscus as well as imaging studies.

 

Contacting an Orthopedic Surgeon 

If you’ve sustained a knee injury, please don’t hesitate to contact one of the OSM Center’s 5 Fairfield County offices. One of our orthopedic specialists will be able to accurately diagnose your injury and come up with a treatment plan that’s right for you. If your injury is a meniscus tear, you’ll be in great hands and we will work with you to get you back to your chosen activity.


4 Ways to Treat Quadriceps Tendinopathy

(Posted on: May 2, 2017)

Quadriceps tendinopathy (formerly known as tendonitis) is a knee injury most commonly sustained by running, jumping, and kicking athletes. The quadriceps muscles and tendon are made up four distinct muscles that merge to create one tendon that comes together at the knee and are integral in straightening the knee and rotation of the hips.  Therefore, quadriceps tendinopathy can severely limit or sideline an athlete. Luckily, non-surgical treatment options are available and effective. The four most common are:

 

  1. Activity modification. Quadriceps tendinopathy is almost always caused by overuse. In many cases, treating the injury is as simple as decreasing the amount or type of training an athlete performs. This decreases the symptoms—pain, swelling, weakness, tenderness— by decreasing tendon stress, scarring, and tearing.

 

Illustration 1- The quadriceps tendon works with the quadriceps muscles to straighten the knee. When it’s injured due to overuse, activity modification can allow athletes to return to competition with little to no downtime.

 

  1. Physical therapy. As shown in Illustration 1, the quadriceps and patella tendon work in unison to straighten/extend the knee. Any imbalance in muscle/tendon strength or flexibility can lead to injury—usually in the form of tendinopathy. For this reason, injured athletes are prescribed stretching and strengthening exercises that decrease symptoms and improve athletic performance by focusing treatment on the musculo-tendinous junction of the system. Other physical therapy treatment methods include massage, electrical stimulation and ultrasound.

 

  1. A neoprene knee brace can be used to support and protect the knee. By holding the patella in correct anatomical position, a brace enables the quadriceps tendon to work properly.

 

Illustration 2- A neoprene knee brace holds the patella in place

  1. Prescription anti-inflammatory medication. A fourth, and common, treatment option is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. These medications are used for pain control and symptom relief by reducing the inflammation in the tendon early on. They can only be prescribed by a physician—typically, an orthopedic specialist.

 

If you’re suffering from knee pain, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices. One of our orthopedic specialists will examine your knee and determine the severity of your injury. Any combination, of the above-mentioned treatment options will be used to get you back where you belong—on the playing field.

 


What Causes Hip Bursitis and How is it Treated?

(Posted on: May 2, 2017)

 Bursitis is a term used to describe inflammation of joint cushioning, fluid-filled sacs known as bursae. Bursae act as cushioning and protection from the muscles rubbing on the underlying bone. The four most common joints that develop bursitis are the elbow, shoulder, knee, and hip. For the purposes of this article, we’ll discuss hip bursitis—specifically, what causes it and how it can be effectively treated.

Hip Anatomy

The hip is a ball and socket joint composed of the head of the leg bone (femur) and acetabulum of the hip. Regarding bursitis, two bursae are important. The first, and most commonly affected, is the greater trochanteric bursa and the second is the iliopsoas bursa.

Causes 

Overuse is the most common causes of hip bursitis. When the hip is stressed due to excess training, exercise, or physical activity, the bursa(e) can become irritated and inflamed, resulting in bursitis. Other causes of hip bursitis are:

  1. Anatomic abnormalities. A difference in leg length can result in excess stress being placed on the hip joints. Spinal abnormalities, such as scoliosis and arthritis, can also stress the joints in a similar manner.

 

  1. An accident. Falls, bumps, and motor vehicle accidents can injure the lower extremity and facilitate hip bursitis.

 

Regardless of the cause, individual cases of bursitis are (generally) treated the same way.

 

Treatments

 Any combination of the following treatment options can be prescribed:

 

  1. Activity modification. Stopping or modifying the activity that is causing the condition typically reduces inflammation.

 

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS). These oral medications reduce pain and decrease inflammation.

 

  1. Physical therapy. Stretching and strengthening exercises are used to increase hip stability and function. It also helps to refocus the stressor of the painful bursae to help it heal. Pain, inflammation and the chances of reoccurring bursitis are decreased.

 

  1. Steroid injections. Fast acting pain relief is afforded through the use of steroid injections. They help to calm down the inflammation, promoting your body to begin the healing process.

 

Because they’re trained to handle joint related injuries and conditions, orthopedic and sports medicine specialists at the OSM Center are the go-to medical professional to treat hip bursitis.

Arranging an Appointment

 

If you can relate to the information in this article, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices. One of our specialists will accurately diagnose and effectively treat your injury. Give us a call and we’ll get you in ASAP.

 


What is Fibromyalgia and How Can It Be Treated?

(Posted on: May 2, 2017)

Most people have heard of Fibromyalgia and may even know someone who has been diagnosed with it. Still, there seems to be a bit of confusion in regards to what Fibromyalgia actually is and how it’s treated. In order to shed light on the condition, let’s go over the signs and symptoms, causes, risk factors and available treatment options.

Signs and Symptoms

Fibromyalgia is defined as widespread muscle pain (shooting, aching, burning, throbbing, stabbing) that has no apparent cause or is not the result of a specific injury. In order for a diagnosis to be made, the most important sign and symptom a patient must have is pain on both sides of the body and above and below the waist. Other signs and symptoms include:

 

  1. Due to widespread muscle pain, patients can be constantly fatigued—regardless of the quality and duration of rest/sleep.
  2. Decreased cognitive function. Pain and fatigue can decrease patients’ ability to focus, concentrate, think and perform daily activities, such as driving, cleaning, and working.
  3. Anxiety and depression. Because fibromyalgia can alter the chemical levels in the brain, mental health problems, most commonly anxiety and depression, can occur.

It’s important to note that no one sign or symptom is enough to definitively diagnose a patient with Fibromyalgia. Usually, a diagnosis is made after other musculoskeletal disorders have been ruled out and a combination of the above-mentioned signs and symptoms are present.

Causes

Current research and thought lead to the belief that the condition is caused by any, or any combination, of the following, however no single cause for the condition has yet to be identified.

-Nervous, immune, and/or endocrine system disorders

-Overproduction of specific chemicals/hormones in the brain

-Sleep problems/disorders

-Stress

-Genetics

-Infection

The signs, symptoms and causes of Fibromyalgia can vary across affected patient populations. Thus, diagnoses and treatments can vary a great deal. Still, certain people are considered most at risk.

Risk Factors

Women between the ages of 20-60 are statistically most at risk. Those with a family history of Fibromyalgia and/or rheumatic disease are also at an increased risk.

Treatment

There’s no gold standard treatment option. Treatment plans are usually a combination of medications, exercise and activity modification. When a patient adheres to the treatment plan prescribed by a Pain Management or Orthopedic Specialist, they can expect:

-Significant pain relief

-Mood improvement

-Increased ability to function (physically and mentally)

Diagnosis

If you’re suffering from widespread pain and can relate to the information in this post, please don’t hesitate to contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment. Our specialists can evaluate, diagnosis and treat your condition. You’ll be in great hands with our caring medical professionals.

fibromyalgia connecticut

THE ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES

(Posted on: May 10, 2017)

Release Date:  February 15, 2017

Contact:   Lisa Jaser, (203) 268-2882, LJaser@osmcenter.com

THE ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES.

 The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull is accepting applications for a $2,000.00 scholarship and several additional scholarships.  The scholarship is open to high school athletes planning to attend college in the fall of 2017.

OSM is looking for outstanding high school seniors who excel in three areas: student athletic achievements, academic accomplishments and community service.  The scholarship is open to high schools where OSM serves as team physicians: Bassick, Central, Masuk, Notre Dame, St. Joseph, Trumbull, and Warren Harding.

“We take great pride in our student athletes as they move toward their goals. OSM is proud to see these students throughout their high school careers as they achieve excellence in athletics, in the community and academically. It is with great pleasure that we serve as team physicians, as this keeps us closely connected to the community we serve,” said OSM Orthopaedic Surgeon Michael Redler, MD.

Interested students must complete the application, which is available from their high school guidance department or athletic director. The application may also be downloaded from OSM’s website, www.osmcenter.com.

Applications must be submitted by Friday, May 19, 2017 to Lisa Jaser, Director of Human Resources, at The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center, 888 White Plains Rd., Trumbull, CT 06611.  OSM will select winners in June 2017.

OSM includes orthopaedic surgeons:  Michael R. Redler, M.D., Peter S. Boone, M.D., Gerard J. Girasole, M.D., David J. Martin, M.D., James I. Spak, M.D., Daniel E. Weiland, M.D., and Mark E. Wilchinsky, M.D. In addition: Isaac Cohen, M.D., Gene Tekmyster, D.O., Marissa M. Smith, M.D., M.S., Michelle Pagliaro Haywood, D.C., Benjamin G. Barnes, D.C., Alan H. Feldman, D.P.M., Rolando R. Lopez, PA-C, Carrie A. Rossi, PA-C, John M. Carravone, PA-C, Michael J. Hann, PA-C, Kaitlyn A. Nadler, AT-C.

OSM surgeons specialize in all aspects of bone and joint surgery as well as sports medicine and spine surgery. The team consists of chiropractors, a podiatrist, physiatrists, physician assistants, and athletic trainers.

OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Shelton, Stratford, and Westport as well as The OSM Therapy Centers in Trumbull, Fairfield, and Shelton.

OSM now offers a walk-in clinic OSMSTAT at their Trumbull and Westport locations for your urgent orthopaedic needs.  Their website is www.osmstat.com.

CLICK HERE TO FILL OUT THE APPLICATION


3 OSM Center Doctors Named as Connecticut Magazine’s Top Orthopedic Docs 2017

(Posted on: April 20, 2017)

We would like to congratulate Dr. Michael Redler, Dr. James Spak and Dr. Daniel Weiland for being recognized by Connecticut Magazine as Top Doctors in the field of Orthopedics for 2017!  This award is given to specialists by their peers and recognizes their commitment to excellent patient care.

How the Doctors Were Chosen

For our annual survey update, we sent more than 5,000 questionnaires to Connecticut doctors, asking them to recommend a doctor (other than themselves) to whom they would send a loved one for expert medical care. In this year’s survey, the focus was on eight specialties: anesthesiology, obstetrics & gynecology, oncology & hematology, otolaryngology (ear, nose & throat), physical medicine, radiology, rheumatology and colorectal surgery.

The top vote-getters in those categories made the Top Docs listings, along with all those doctors in other specialties who finished at the top of our surveys from the years 2014-16. We’ve done our best to update all the doctors’ information along the way. Note: Doctors do not pay to make this list; only the doctors most frequently recommended by their peers are listed as Top Docs.

The result is 811 doctors in 31 specialties, in all the result of more than 15,000 questionnaires sent out over a four-year period. With such a wide array of specialties covered, this guide makes a very good place to begin your search for medical help.


back pain epidural
How Epidural Injections Treat Nerve Pain

(Posted on: April 4, 2017)

If you’re experiencing nerve pain that originates in your spine and radiates to an extremity (sometimes referred to as sciatica),  you don’t need to suffer. Epidural injections are a non-surgical treatment option that can help you. In this article, you’ll learn when they’re used, how they work, and if they’re right for you. Let’s jump right in:

Epidural Injections: When They’re Used

Epidural injections are used to treat localized or radiating pain that’s caused by a pinched nerve in the spine.  Common reasons for a nerve being pinched are:

  • – A bulged disc
  • – A herniated disc
  • – Spinal Stenosis
  • – Spinal arthritis (Spondylosis)
  • – Spondylolisthesis

Illustration 1– A pinched nerve due to a herniated disc

In most cases, epidural injections are used after conservative treatment options have produced little to no symptom relief. Injections are used to help facilitate return to normal function by decreasing pain and nerve root swelling and irritations. It should be noted that non-invasive treatment is neither stopped nor replaced by epidural injections. A comprehensive treatment plan that includes injections, activity modification, physical therapy, and other pain management measures is most effective.

Epidural Injections: How They Work

 The epidural space lies between the membrane of the spinal cord and the vertebral wall of the spinal canal. Because it’s close to the nerve roots, the epidural space is the ideal location to administer a combination of anesthetic and anti-inflammatory medications that quickly decrease nerve irritation and pain. For some patients, one epidural injection provides lasting symptom relief. Depending on severity of the symptoms multiple injections may be needed.

Epidural Injections: The Procedure

 The first step in a successful procedure involves identifying the problematic nerve. Once the nerve is identified, our specially trained interventional Physiatrists are experts in safe and effective injection treatments. The injection doesn’t take long—a needle is inserted into the epidural space and the medication is administered. This is done quickly and efficiently by using an X-ray to guide the needle to exactly the right place. After which contrast dye is used to confirm the spread of the medication along the injured nerve root. The patient is able to return home immediately after, with essentially no recovery time.

Epidural Injections: Finding a Pain Management Specialist

Pain, numbness, burning or tingling that starts in the spine and radiates to an extremity can be treated with epidural injections. But not before non-invasive measures have been tried. In order to find out if epidural injections might be the treatment option that’s right for you, please contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment. The road to overcoming nerve pain starts when you walk through our doors.

 


3 Common Hip Injuries Following a Motor Vehicle Accident

(Posted on: April 4, 2017)

Injuries following a motor vehicle accident (MVA) should be taken seriously, especially those related to the hip. Delaying treatment can lead to future problems, like osteoporosis. If you or someone you know has sustained any of the injuries presented below, arranging an appointment with an orthopedic specialist should be a priority.

Common Injury #1: A Dislocated Hip

Accident related hip dislocations are usually caused by the knee being forced into the dashboard, which causes a displacement of the hip. Individuals who experience a dislocation will know it immediately as they will feel their hip pop “out of place” and will have onset of immediate and significant pain. It’s likely that walking or even standing will be very difficult. Because of this, emergency treatment is necessary. If there’s an associated fracture, which is likely, surgical intervention might be necessary.

 

Illustration 1– An x-ray of a severely dislocated hip

 

Common Injury #2: A Hip Fracture

The hip is a joint composed of the head of the femur (ball) and pelvic acetabulum (socket). Forceful impact in a collision can fracture either or both bones. Surgery is most likely indicted and will often involve instrumentation to secure the bones in place.  If a fracture isn’t severe, and non-displaced non-surgical treatment options, such as pain medications, physical therapy, and activity modification, can be used.

Illustration 2– Instrumentation such as screws can be used to reduce, compress, and fixate a hip fracture, allowing for a more rapid return to full activity.

 

Common Injury #3: A Strain or Sprain

Hip muscle strains or ligament sprains are common after an MVA. Both injuries are far less severe than a dislocation or fracture, yet, medical attention is still required. Pain, swelling, inflammation, and decreased range of motion are all common symptoms that, when left untreated, can lead to decreased mobility and long term reduction of function. Treatment for strains and sprains can include:

  • – Anti-inflammatory medications, including oral steroids
  • –  Physical therapy
  • – Activity modification
  • – Injection treatment

 

In most cases, when treated appropriately, strains and sprains will heal within a relatively short period of time.

Contacting an Orthopedic Specialist

Proper and prompt treatment of an MVA related hip injury should be given top priority. Contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment with one of our specialists. Their knowledge, experience, and skills will be put to use to accurately diagnose and put in place an effective treatment plan. When in the right hands, a full recovery is entirely possible.

 


Patellar Tendon Tears: Everything You Need to Know

(Posted on: April 4, 2017)

A patellar tendon tear is a serious injury typically sustained by athletes and active individuals. Because the patellar tendon plays an important role in straightening the knee, proper diagnosis and treatment of the injury are of the utmost importance. If you’ve injured your patellar tendon and think it might be torn, here’s everything you need to know:

Related Anatomy

The patellar tendon attaches the patella to the shinbone. The quadriceps tendon attaches the patella to the quadriceps muscles. The patellar tendon is the extension of the quadriceps tendon as it travels across the knee joint. When the tendons and muscles flex, the knee straightens.

 

Illustration 1- The tendons and muscles responsible for straightening the knee

 

As shown in Illustration 1, the patellar tendon is centrally located and thus a tear decreases function, performance, and the ability to bear weight.

Causes

A partial or complete tear can occur due to any of the following reasons:

  1. Running and jumping. Bending the knee and forcefully planting the foot, like when running and jumping, can overload the tendon and cause it to tear.
  1. A direct blow to the patella can cause the bone to move or displace. A resulting fracture and/or tendon tear is possible.
  1. The tendon becomes weak with age and/or overuse. A tendon that’s weaker than the muscles it works with can easily tear.

 

Illustration 2- The different types of patellar tendon tears

In many cases, weakness can also be attributed to an underlying medical condition like arthritis or a disease that limits blood supply (i.e. renal failure, diabetes, metabolic disease).

Symptoms

The initial symptom presents as a popping sensation that’s felt and heard by the injured individual. Immediately after, the following symptoms occur:

  • – Pain
  • – Swelling
  • – Bruising
  • – Tenderness
  • – Inability to straightening the knee
  • – Inability to bear weight on the knee

Management of these symptoms and the tear should only be done by an Orthopedic or Sports Medicine Specialist. Treatment plans vary based on the severity and exact location of the tear.

Non-Surgical Treatment

Partial tears are treated using non-surgical measures. The two key treatments are:

  1. A knee immobilizer limits or prohibits the knee from bending. With time, a partially torn tendon’s fibers will reattach to one another, restoring function and strength.
  1. Physical therapy. Exercises aimed at strengthening the patella tendon help patients recover quickly.

The healing process for a partial tear can take anywhere from 2-3 weeks to 5-6 months and is most often related to the severity of the tear.

Surgical Treatment

 A completely torn tendon requires surgery, but is usually performed arthroscopically and on an outpatient basis. During the procedure, an orthopedic surgeon re-attaches the tendon using small sutures and special surgical knots to provide strength to the ligament. X-rays are taken to ensure the anatomical position of the repaired tendon and patella matches that of the non-surgically repaired ones.

Physical therapy following surgery is an important part of the recovery process. It begins two weeks after and may continue in some fashion for a few months.

 Contacting an Orthopedic Specialist

Delaying treatment of a patellar tendon tear is never a good idea. If you’ve injured your knee and think you might have a patellar tendon injury or tear, please contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices. One of our Orthopedic or Sports Medicine Specialists will properly diagnosis and treat your injury. When in the right hands, a full recovery is entirely possible.


Can Physical Therapy Reduce the Symptoms of Spinal Stenosis?

(Posted on: April 4, 2017)

Spinal Stenosis and its associated symptoms can limit physical activity and alter a patient’s day-to-day life. One of the best ways to prevent this from happening is early diagnosis and treatment. Although there is no cure for Spinal Stenosis, physical therapy is a great way to slow down the progression of the condition and minimize or even eliminate symptoms. 

Passive Physical Therapy for Spinal Stenosis

Physical therapy that’s administered by a Physical Therapist is called Passive Physical Therapy. Because the patient does no work during the sessions, passive therapy is a great way to treat the initial symptoms of spinal stenosis in combination with more active approaches.  Some of the most common types of passive therapy are:

  1. Deep tissue massage. Relieving muscle tension can help to better participate in active therapy treatments.
  1. Nerve stimulation. Mild electrical impulses release endorphins, the body’s natural pain relievers and can help to maintain muscle tension to provide support for the spine.
  1. Improved circulation, via heat supplied by sound waves, decreases pain, swelling, and inflammation.

Illustration 1– Passive therapy can reduce inflammation and other symptoms of spinal stenosis, but only in combination with active physical therapy and exercise.

 

A Physical Therapist can prescribe any, or any combination, of these treatments based on the severity of symptoms.

Active Physical Therapy

Active physical therapy refers to stretching and strengthening exercises performed by the patient, under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist. Because no two patients are the same, an active physical therapy plan is always customized. Some of the benefits of active therapy include:

  • -Improved spine flexibility and strength
  • -Increased core strength
  • -Improved posture

All of these can lead to lasting symptom relief.

 

Combining Physical Therapy with Other Treatment Options

Orthopedic and musculoskeletal specialists are the best suited to prescribe physical therapy to treat spinal stenosis. In some cases, they may combine physical therapy with over-the-counter anti-inflammatories, prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, and/or spine injections. When spinal stenosis isn’t diagnosed and treated early, the condition might reach the point where surgery is the only treatment option.

Contacting a Spine Specialist

If you have back and/or extremity pain that won’t go away, it’s important that you contact a spine specialist. Their knowledge and experience allow them to properly diagnose and treat back pain caused by a variety of conditions, including spinal stenosis. Give us a call at one of our 5 Fairfield County locations and will get you an appointment ASAP.  Earlier recognition of symptoms and beginning of treatment is associated with better long term outcomes.

physical therapy spinal stenosis

shoulder injury
Shoulder Injuries: The Two Most Common Types of Labral Tears

(Posted on: April 4, 2017)

One of the most common shoulder injuries is a tear of the labrum, which helps to stabilize the joint. These injuries can be aggravating at best, debilitating at worst. The hallmark is shoulder instability, but can also present as pain, weakness and loss of motion. If your shoulder feels loose or out of place, you might have a labral tear.

SLAP Tears

A Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) tear is a serious injury caused by accident, injury, overuse, or degenerative processes associated with aging. Because an entire region of the labrum is torn, a slap tear can cause a host of unpleasant symptoms:

  1. Instability related symptoms. Popping, grinding, catching, and/or locking is common. So is a feeling that the shoulder is going to pop out of its socket.
  1. Pain-related symptoms. Overhead movements and holding the shoulder in certain positions can be extremely painful. 
  1. Weakness related symptoms. A decrease in shoulder strength and athletic performance occurs following a SLAP tear. In some cases, athletes may not be able to perform. This is most often due to associated biceps tendon injury.

Illustration 1- A SLAP tear–an entire region of the glenoid labrum is torn

 

After diagnosing the injury, an orthopedic specialist determines if the tear is serious enough to require arthroscopic surgery. If it isn’t, physical therapy, activity modification, and anti-inflammatory medications are used as treatment measures. Regenerative injections, such as those using PRP can also be considered. If surgery is necessary, it is usually done arthroscopically to repair and re-attach the labrum to the bone.

A Bankart Tear

The term Bankart is used to describe a tear of the inferior (lower) rim of the labrum. Symptoms are similar to those of a SLAP tear. But, because of the way it’s situated, the shoulder is especially susceptible to dislocation following a Bankart tear. In some cases,

A dislocation can cause a portion of the glenoid bone to fracture. This type of injury is known as a bony Bankart.

Illustration 2– A Bankart tear

 

Non-surgical treatment of a Bankart tear is possible; however, there’s a risk of future shoulder dislocation. Thus, surgical repair is at times necessary. The outpatient procedure is used to repair the tear and, if necessary, reattach fractured bone.

Contacting an Orthopedic Specialist

You shouldn’t have to suffer from the unpleasant symptoms of shoulder instability.  And, you shouldn’t have to worry about your shoulder dislocating. Please give us a call at one of our 5 Fairfield County offices to arrange an appointment with one of our orthopedic specialists. Your condition will be properly diagnosed and treated. Expect a full recovery when in the hands of our trusted physicians.

 


The 4 Most Common Orthopedic Injuries at the Gym and How to Avoid Them

(Posted on: April 4, 2017)

If you’re an avid gym goer, you definitely want to be aware of the most common gym-related injuries. And, more importantly, you want to know how to prevent them. In order to stay injury free while at the gym, here’s everything you need to know:

Injury #1: Lower Back Strains and Sprains

Even with proper form, repetitive lifting of heavy weights can place a fair amount of stress on the muscles and ligaments of the lower back. But, improper lifting technique can cause painful strains and sprains that might sideline you for an extended period of time. In order to prevent this, the following measures can be taken:

  1. Monitor your technique. Mirrors aren’t just for admiring your muscles. Looking for breakdowns in technique and then making adjustments is the best way to prevent injury.
  1. Perform warm up and warm up sets. Two or three light to moderate weight warm up sets should be done before heavy lifting sets. Gradually increase the weight during each of these sets.
  1. Work on your core strength. Improve ab and lower back strength helps prevent injury causing breakdowns in technique and prevent posterior and anterior chain disparities.

Using any, or all, of these measures and your chances of being injured will drastically decrease.

Injury #2: Bursitis

The bursae are small, fluid-filled sacs that cushion the joints of the body. Anytime a joint is over- used, worked, or trained, the bursae can become inflamed in what’s known as bursitis. The condition can occur in the:

  • Shoulder
  • Elbow
  • Hip
  • Knee

Symptoms include pain, swelling, and tenderness. In order to prevent bursitis, it’s recommended that you:

  • Avoid overtraining
  • Ice areas as soon as symptoms present
  • Warm up before lifting and stretch after work outs

Taking these preventative measures will ensure you’re not limited by the aggravating symptoms of bursitis.

Injury #3: Elbow Tendinopathy (tendinitis)

 Excessive gripping of objects, like barbells, dumbbells, and weight machine grips, can lead to medial (inside) or lateral (outside) elbow pain caused by tendinopathy.

elbow tendonitis

Illustration 1– Medial elbow tendonitis, commonly referred to as golfer’s elbow

To prevent elbow tendinitis, avoid overtraining and perform exercises to perform grip strength—strong hand and forearm muscles decrease the amount of stress placed on elbow tendons.

Injury #4:  Pulled Hamstring Muscle

Overloading the leg muscles can lead to a pulled hamstring. The symptoms of this injury are pain and inability to bend the knee. Because they can take months to heal, you want to do everything you can to prevent hamstring injuries. Use all of the following preventative measures:

  1. Avoid overloading the muscles by performing warm up sets
  2. Never overexert yourself by lifting too much weight
  3. Properly warm up the muscles before lifting sessions, and stretch after. A foam roller after work outs is also a great recovery tool.
  4. Pay close attention to lifting technique
  5. Always use a spotter

The importance of preventing hamstring injuries can never be overemphasized. Always be extra careful in regards to this injury.

Contacting an Orthopedic or Sports Medicine Specialist

You’re now aware of four common injuries that happen at the gym. And, you know how to prevent them. Take this information to heart and remain injury free so you can enjoy working out and living your life.

If it’s too late and you’ve already sustained a gym-related injury, please contact one of our 5 Fairfield County offices. Making an appointment is easier than ever—we’ll get you in ASAP and will help to develop a treatment plan to get you back to working out.

 

fitness injury

What’s a Torn Hip Labrum? Can Surgery Correct It?

(Posted on: March 15, 2017)

A torn hip labrum is an injury that causes pain and instability that can be extremely difficult to deal with. For many patients, surgical repair of the torn labrum is necessary to alleviate pain and increase mobility in the hip. The good news is that there are new surgical and interventional options that decrease operative and recovery time. Here’s everything you need to know:

Anatomy

The hip is a ball and socket joint composed of the head of the femur and acetabulum. In order to prevent instability and bone-on-bone contact, the soft tissue labrum surrounds the outside edge of the acetabulum and acts as a suction cup, keeping the head of the femur in place, while allowing it to rotate.

torn hip labrum

Illustration 1– The bones of the hip joint and soft tissue labrum

A labral tear can result in pain, instability, stiffness, and decreased function.

Causes

Labral tears are seen across all patient populations. The most common causes are:

  • Wear and tear due to aging
  • Athletic injuries
  • Overuse
  • Abnormal anatomy
  • Hip impingement syndrome
  • Arthritis

Tears in the labrum should to be treated appropriately in order to prevent arthritis.  If the damage to the labrum progresses, it can cause the bones of the hip joint to begin to rub together.  This rubbing can cause bone spurs and arthritis in the hip, which may severely damage the hip joint and result in the need for Total Hip Replacement.

Arthroscopic Labral Repair Surgery

Surgery repairs the labrum as well as other cartilage that has been damaged.  Using a small camera, known as an arthroscope, the surgeon is able to access the hip joint and view the labrum in detail.  Once the tear has been identified, loose or torn pieces of cartilage can be trimmed away as well as any bone spurs that may have formed.

The goal is to restore the integrity and function of the joint so the patient can live a normal, pain-free life. Following surgery, Physical Therapy is used to regain strength and stability in the hip joint. The recovery time depends on the severity of the tear, but generally takes only a few weeks.

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center has 5 locations throughout Fairfield County.  We utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


Does a Torn Meniscus Always Need Surgery?

(Posted on: March 15, 2017)

“I tore my meniscus so I am probably going to need surgery” —it’s a common thought.  But, it’s also a misconception.

Non-operative treatment of meniscus tears exists and can be effective. An orthopedic surgeon’s treatment recommendation depends on a variety of factors.

How to Determine if a Torn Meniscus Can Be Treated Without Surgery

 There are three things to look for:

  1. Blood supply. The meniscus is classified into two zones, the red zone and white zone. A torn meniscus that has sufficient blood supply (red zone) can often heal without surgery. But, a torn meniscus with a poor blood supply (white zone) often requires surgical repair.
  2. Knee stability. If there is no ligament damage and the knee is stable, the tear can often heal and normal function can be maintained.
  3. Patients who suffer a tear but experience little to no symptoms is likely to be treated non-operatively.

Once your sports medicine specialist has made a diagnosis, a treatment plan can be put into place that will best address the pathology and the resulting limitations.

Non-Operative Treatment of a Torn Meniscus

The first step in treatment is to reduce pain and swelling, usually only taking a few days to improve. At this point, physical therapy is prescribed with the goal being to strengthen muscles of the knee so the joint maintains/improves stability and function. Depending on the severity of injury and symptoms, therapy can be short (2-3 weeks) or long-term (6-8 months), with a progression to a home exercise program and maintenance routine.

Surgical Procedures for Meniscus Tears

As mentioned above, the meniscus is divided into the red zone and the white zone.  The type of procedure recommended is based on where the tear has occurred.

A Tear in the Red Zone

The Red Zone is the outer edge of the meniscus that does have some blood supply. Due to this blood supply, the healing potential is usually much greater and the cartilage can become strong and healthy again.

The most common procedure to treat the Red Zone tears is a Meniscus Repair. This procedure involves using a small puncture to access the meniscus. Once the incision is made, a small camera (arthroscope) is inserted into the knee and surgical tools are used to stitch the meniscus back to its original position, approximating the edges and allowing the tear to heal.

A Tear in the White Zone

The White Zone is the inner 2/3 of the meniscus that is avascular, meaning it has little to no direct blood supply. For this reason, tears in this area not stitched back together because they will not heal.

If surgery is needed for a tear in the White Zone, a procedure known as Meniscectomy is usually performed. This procedure involves using a small camera (arthroscope) to visualize into the knee joint and the torn portions of the meniscus are trimmed, relieving pain and allowing one to return to activity, following a course of physical therapy.

Contacting an Orthopedic Surgeon

Sometimes, surgery isn’t needed for meniscus tears, but only a sports medicine specialist or orthopedic surgeon can determine the best course of action. Give us a call to schedule an appointment and evaluation. One of our specialists will provide you with everything you need to know.

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center has 5 locations throughout Fairfield County.  We utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


hip replacment connecticut
Hip Replacement Surgery: Everything You Need to Know

(Posted on: March 15, 2017)

Successful hip replacement surgeries give hundreds of thousands of people the opportunity to live quality, pain-free lives. If you’re suffering from hip pain that, despite non-surgical treatment, won’t go away, a hip replacement might be the treatment solution you’ve been searching for. Here’s everything you need to know:

Related Anatomy

The hip is a ball and socket joint composed of the head of the femur and the acetabulum of the hip. Like all joints of the body, the hip is susceptible to arthritis and its associated symptoms.

 

arthritic hip

Illustration 1– A normal hip vs. an arthritic one

Causes of Arthritis

The three types of arthritis that can affect the hip joint are:

  1. Age-related arthritis that develops due to naturally occurring degenerative processes in the body. As seen in the illustration above, osteoarthritis wears done cartilage that covers and protects the bone. As wearing increases, painful bone-on-bone rubbing occurs.
  1. Post-traumatic arthritis. Accidents or injuries can damage the bone and cartilage of the hip joint and cause early onset arthritis. Patients who sustain hip fractures or dislocations are especially susceptible to post-traumatic arthritis.
  1. Rheumatoid arthritis. An autoimmune disorder known as rheumatoid arthritis causes chronic inflammation that disrupts the integrity of the joint. Patients with this condition experience arthritis to differing degrees. While the condition can be treated using medications prescribed by a rheumatologist, a hip replacement is necessary in severe cases, however is usually a late finding as RA involves smaller joints early in the disease process.

 Surgical Treatment

A total hip replacement replaces the head of the femur and acetabulum of the hip with metal and plastic components. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia and takes 1-2 hours. Depending on the patient and circumstances, it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with one going home later in the day, however more commonly, a short hospital stay is to be expected.

 

Illustration 2– A total hip replacement restores the hip joint, decreases the symptoms of arthritis, and improves quality of life

Recovery

Physical therapy and home exercise program is a big part of the recovery process. In most cases, it’s started the day of surgery, as early mobilization results in better outcomes. Once the patient is discharged from the hospital, home therapy sessions last until the first visit with the operating surgeon.  Therapy can be continued on an outpatient basis, as determined by the operating surgeon, until the patient has made a full recovery, usually around the 6-8 month mark. 

Results

Patient satisfaction following a total hip replacement is high. The symptoms associated with changes due to arthritis are reduced (or eliminated) and the patient is able to return to a normal, fully functional life. Sometimes restrictions are put in place depending on the patient, and type of replacement that is used.

Contacting an Orthopedic Surgeon

Orthopedic surgeons are the only medical professionals who have been trained to perform total hip replacements. If you can relate to the information in this post, please give us a call to arrange an appointment with one of our specialists. They will evaluate your hip and come up with a treatment plan that’s right for you. You’ll be on the road to recovery and can look forward to living a long and happy, pain free life.

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center has 5 locations throughout Fairfield County.  We utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


ALERT: OSMCenter Closed 3/14/17

(Posted on: March 14, 2017)

Due to inclement weather, all OSMCenter & OSM Stat locations will be closed Tuesday, March 14th, 2017. Thank you for your understanding. – OSMCenter Staff


pain management ct
The 3 Most Common Injuries Treated Using Pain Management

(Posted on: March 10, 2017)

Pain due to an injury can completely change a person’s life. But it doesn’t have to. Thanks to pain management specialists and knowledge of interventional and non-interventional methods, patients that sustain injuries have an effective treatment solution where there once was very few options. The three most common injuries treated using pain management are:

Neck and Back

Neck and back injuries happen—at some point in life—to everyone. In cases where a patient isn’t getting relief from traditional treatment and isn’t a candidate for surgery, pain management can provide sustained relief. Non-invasive and minimally invasive treatment can be used to treat a multitude of injuries that stem from work related accidents, falls, car accidents or even some degenerative conditions.

Once a patient’s pain has been controlled, they’re able to return to a normal, functional life.

Knee

A knee injury can cause the early onset of arthritis. Patients who develop severe arthritis, but don’t meet the requirements to be a candidate for a total knee replacement (TKR), can be treated using pain management and also regenerative medicine, such as PRP. In some cases, pain is controlled and surgery isn’t necessary. In others, pain is controlled until the patient becomes a candidate for a TKR.

Hip

In a similar scenario as knee pain, hip pain due to arthritis can be controlled using pain management. Non-invasive and minimally invasively treatments can help decrease or eliminate pain and improve function. These treatments can be indefinite, or until a definitive solution can be undertaken.  

Contacting a Pain Management Specialist

If you’ve sustained any of the above-mentioned injuries and haven’t been able to find relief, pain management might be the treatment option that’s right for you. Please contact our office to schedule an appointment.

At The OSM Center, our Physiatry Team is led by Dr. Isaac Cohen and Dr. Gene Tekmyster. Both doctors work closely with the Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, Sports Medicine, Spine Surgery and Orthopedic Specialists at OSM Center to create a unique treatment protocol for each patient.  


Dr. Michael Redler Named “Orthopedic Surgeon to Know” by Becker’s Orthopedic Review

(Posted on: February 16, 2017)

 

 

(Reposted from Becker’s Orthopedic Review Article February 13, 2017)

Michael Redler, MD, is an orthopedic surgeon at The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center’s Connecticut offices.

He specializes in sports medicine and hand and upper extremity surgery.

Much of Dr. Redler’s research and work focuses on upper extremity surgical techniques for athletic injuries and degenerative conditions. He is a visiting assistant professor of orthopedics at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, an assistant professor at Sacred Heart University’s departments of athletic training and physical therapy in Fairfield, Conn., and an assistant professor at the Frank H. Netter school of medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn.

In addition to practicing and teaching medicine, Dr. Redler is the head team physician for Sacred Heart University’s 32 athletic teams. He often writes about hand and upper extremity surgery and has presented his research all over the globe.

Dr. Redler is a featured speaker at the Becker’s 15th Annual Spine, Orthopedic and Pain Management-Driven ASC Conference + The Future of Spine, June 22 to 24, 2017 in Chicago.


OSM Scholarship Application

(Posted on: March 6, 2017)

2017 Scholarship Application (1)Please print out and return to the address listed below.


THE ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES

(Posted on: March 6, 2017)

Release Date:  February 15, 2017

Contact:   Lisa Jaser, (203) 268-2882, LJaser@osmcenter.com

THE ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ANNOUNCES ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO FAIRFIELD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ATHLETES.

 The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull is accepting applications for a $2,000.00 scholarship and several additional scholarships.  The scholarship is open to high school athletes planning to attend college in the fall of 2017.

OSM is looking for outstanding high school seniors who excel in three areas: student athletic achievements, academic accomplishments and community service.  The scholarship is open to high schools where OSM serves as team physicians: Bassick, Central, Masuk, Notre Dame, St. Joseph, Trumbull, and Warren Harding.

“We take great pride in our student athletes as they move toward their goals. OSM is proud to see these students throughout their high school careers as they achieve excellence in athletics, in the community and academically. It is with great pleasure that we serve as team physicians, as this keeps us closely connected to the community we serve,” said OSM Orthopaedic Surgeon Michael Redler, MD.

Interested students must complete the application, which is available from their high school guidance department or athletic director. The application may also be downloaded from OSM’s website, www.osmcenter.com.

Applications must be submitted by Friday, May 19, 2017 to Lisa Jaser, Director of Human Resources, at The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center, 888 White Plains Rd., Trumbull, CT 06611.  OSM will select winners in June 2017.

OSM includes orthopaedic surgeons:  Michael R. Redler, M.D., Peter S. Boone, M.D., Gerard J. Girasole, M.D., David J. Martin, M.D., James I. Spak, M.D., Daniel E. Weiland, M.D., and Mark E. Wilchinsky, M.D. In addition: Isaac Cohen, M.D., Gene Tekmyster, D.O., Marissa M. Smith, M.D., M.S., Michelle Pagliaro Haywood, D.C., Benjamin G. Barnes, D.C., Alan H. Feldman, D.P.M., Rolando R. Lopez, PA-C, Carrie A. Rossi, PA-C, John M. Carravone, PA-C, Michael J. Hann, PA-C, Kaitlyn A. Nadler, AT-C.

OSM surgeons specialize in all aspects of bone and joint surgery as well as sports medicine and spine surgery. The team consists of chiropractors, a podiatrist, physiatrists, physician assistants, and athletic trainers.

OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Shelton, Stratford, and Westport as well as The OSM Therapy Centers in Trumbull, Fairfield, and Shelton.

OSM now offers a walk-in clinic OSMSTAT at their Trumbull and Westport locations for your urgent orthopaedic needs.  Their website is www.osmstat.com.

CLICK HERE TO FILL OUT THE APPLICATION


The Most Common Ways to Treat Knee Arthritis

(Posted on: February 13, 2017)

The unpleasant symptoms of knee arthritis are often life-altering. A person’s ability to function on a day to day basis can be severely limited by:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Weakness
  • Stiffness

While arthritis can’t be cured, the above-mentioned symptoms can be relieved and treated. The most common ways are:

Lifestyle changes

  1. Diet
  • Weight loss due to an improved diet takes a tremendous amount of stress off the knee. For every pound of weight loss, the knee feels 4 less pounds of pressure.
  1. Physical activity
  • Participating in non-impact or even light impact physical activity strengthens the muscles that support the knee.
  1. Physical aids
  • Orthopedic boots, shoes, canes, walkers, and braces are used to take the weight of the knee, pressure of the jointand improve mobility.
  1. Physical therapy (PT)
  • PT uses strengthening and stretching exercises to reduce symptoms and improve mobility and quality of life.In addition, PT can help with knee stability, improving pain.

 

Medications

  1. Over-the-counter oral medication(OTC) pain relievers
  • Acetaminophen is the most commonly used pain reliever and, in many cases, the first medication used to treat knee arthritis.
  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)
  • NSAIDS decrease pain and inflammation. They’re available in OTC and prescription forms. The most common are ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), and prescription only (Celebrex and Mobic).
  1. Corticosteroid injections
  • Corticosteroids are a powerful anti-inflammatory agent that are injected into the knee. They are often a first line intervention for reducing pain and swelling associated with arthritis.
  1. Viscosupplementation

These injections are used to help lubricated a knee joint and potentially halp in healing injured cartilage. It is a specially made compound similar to that of cartilgage.

  1. PRP (platelet rich plasma)

In recent years, PRP has gained significant traction in treating arthritic pain, mostly for its regenerative potential in degenerative conditions.

 

Surgical Options

  1. Arthroscopic knee surgery
  • This type of surgery is used to treat soft tissue that’s been damaged due to arthritis. The two most common procedures performed are meniscal repair and meniscal debridement.
  1. Total knee replacement surgery
  • Severe knee arthritis is treated by removing affected bone and then replacing it with metal and other alloy components. The quality of life dramatically improves following a total knee replacement, with most people returning to activities they enjoyed before being affected with knee pain.

Which treatment option is right for you is best determined by an orthopedic specialist. Even though they can’t cure arthritis, they can manage it to the point where you live with little to no pain. Making an appointment is easier than ever. When you’re ready, please give us a call.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


Can Ankle Fractures Be Treated Non-Surgically?

(Posted on: February 13, 2017)

Many ankle fractures can heal just fine without surgery. The key is in the diagnosis, which, of course, is always left up to an orthopedic surgeon or sports medicine specialist. If he or she decides that surgery isn’t necessary, here’s what will happen:

The Ankle Will Be Placed in a Splint

The key to effective non-surgical treatment is immobilization. Because there’s always a great deal of swelling following an ankle fracture, a splint will be used to ensure the ankle isn’t constricted.

Illustration 1– A splint immobilizes the ankle while it’s still  swollen

Once the swelling has gone down (usually after 1-2 weeks), the next treatment step occurs.

The Ankle Will Be Placed in a Hard Cast

A hard cast is the ultimate form of immobilization. Orthopedic practices have trained cast professionals that place the ankle in the proper anatomical position (to ensure healing occurs) before applying the cast.

Illustration 2– A cast immobilizes the ankle and allows it to heal

Usually, the patient will remain in a cast for 2-6 weeks depending on the severity and location of the fracture. Once x-rays show enough healing has occurred, the next step will be taken.

The Ankle Will Be Placed in a Walking Boot

 A walking boot immobilizes the ankle while allowing the patient to bear partial weight.

Illustration 3– A walking boot is the last form of immobilization

After a period of 2-4 weeks, x-rays will be taken to ensure the fractured bone has fully healed. If everything checks out, the patient can resume normal day to day activities.

Contact an Orthopedic Specialist if You Have an Ankle Fracture

An orthopedic or sports medicine specialist is the best medical professional to contact if you’ve sustained an ankle fracture. Their knowledge and experience allow them to determine if surgical or non-surgical treatment will be needed. If non-surgical treatment is the choice, you’ll be in the great hands and can make a full recovery when you choose the right specialist.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.

ankle fracture connecticut

prp injection
6 Things You Should Know About PRP Injections

(Posted on: February 8, 2017)

WHAT IS PRP (PLATELET RICH PLASMA), AND WHAT IS IT USED FOR?

PRP is a concentration of platelets and growth factors that play a significant role in the biology of healing and tissue regeneration. It also contains other cell components that work in a together variety of ways to promote healing and prevent tissue degeneration. The therapeutic PRP dose delivers a 4-6 fold increase in platelet concentration compared to normal blood, thus concentrating the components responsible for healing when being injected into injured tissue.

HOW IS IT PERFORMED?

After a blood sample is obtained from a patient, the blood is put into a centrifuge which separates the blood into its many components. Platelet rich plasma can then be collected and delivered to an injured area of bone or soft tissue, such as a tendon, ligament, joint or disc, via an injection. Ultrasound or fluoroscopy guidance can assist in the precise placement of PRP in a process that usually takes a total of 20-30 minutes. There may be soreness at the site of the injection that can last for a few days. Most people return to work and normal day to day activities immediately after the injection.

DOES IT HURT AND IS IT SAFE?

A local anesthetic is used which results in minimal discomfort. Since PRP is prepared from your own blood, there is no risk of rejection or disease transmission and virtually no risk of infection.

HOW WELL DOES IT WORK?

There have been numerous clinical studies that show significant healing and long lasting reduction in pain of a variety of injuries. Common injuries include tendon and ligament damage, disc degeneration, as well as joint pain and arthritis. Results are proving PRP to be an effective and superior alternative to steroid injections which temporarily help alleviate pain symptoms but do not heal the cause of your pain. In a small study involving knee osteoarthritis, PRP treatment was shown to be more effective than hyaluronic acid viscosupplementation treatments. PRP may eliminate the need for more aggressive treatments such as long-term medication or surgery.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I REPEAT THIS   PROCEDURE?

You may gain considerable to complete relief after the first injection.  In some cases, especially when the problem has been chronic, additional PRP injections may be necessary. Up to three injections may be given within a six month time frame. These are usually performed at 4-6 weeks apart, if needed.

WHAT ARE THE EXPECTED RESULTS?

Both  ultrasound  and  MRI  images  have  shown definitive tissue repair  after  PRP  therapy, confirming the  healing process. The need for surgery can also be greatly reduced by treating injured tissue before the damage progresses and the condition is irreversible. PRP therapy does not provide immediate relief; instead, it sets in motion a repair mechanism that takes several weeks before pain relief is felt by instigating and promoting tissue healing.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available, including PRP injections. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  We have 5 locations throughout Fairfield County, CT. Contact us today to schedule a consult.


The 3 Most Common Symptoms of a Torn Ankle Ligament (And What You Can Do About Them)

(Posted on: January 26, 2017)

Almost all of us at some point in our lives have missed a stair, slipped on ice or just rolled our ankle and felt the pain of a sprained ankle. When the ankle is over rotated, the ligaments of the ankle can become stretched which is what causes the pain and swelling associated with an ankle sprain. However, many people are unsure of the severity of the sprain or if significant damage occurs. It is therefore very important to understand how the severity of the injury plays a role in the treatment and potential recovery.

Sprained ligaments are ligaments that have been abnormally stretched. Ankle sprains classified as mild to moderate indicate sprained ligaments. These would be considered a Grade I ankle injury/sprain.

Torn ligaments are those that have been partially or fully torn. It’s confusing, but ankle sprains that are classified as moderate to severe indicate that ligaments have been torn—a serious injury. These injuries would be classified as Grade II (partial tear) and Grade III (full tear) injury.

The three most common signs of torn ligaments are:

  1. Pain.   The first symptom is pain immediately following the injury. The amount of pain alone is not always enough to diagnose a tear, but it’s a clear-cut sign that a tear might have occurred. If a person has experienced an ankle injury in the past, they can compare pain levels to get a feel for how severe their current injury is.

 

  1. Swelling and bruising.   Because the foot and ankle bear most of the body’s weight, swelling and bruising always occur following an injury. The degree to which swelling and bruising occur depends on the individual and severity of the injury.

 

  1. Instability.    A surefire way to tell if a ligament has been torn is to assess the degree of instability. Severe lack of stability, balance, and ability to bear weight are often signs that a ligament has been torn. Your doctor can test the stability of the ankle with several physical exam maneuvers.

If you have any of the symptoms above, it is best to seek the expertise of an orthopedic or sports medicine specialist to determine the severity of the injury and develop an appropriate treatment plan.  

In most cases, these injuries can be managed with rest, ice and a brace. When these injuries are not treated properly or fail to heal, they can lead to further damage to the ligament and possibly require surgical correction.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.

ankle ligament

Why are Stress Fractures Common in Athletes?

(Posted on: December 15, 2016)

Stress fractures are an overuse injury that presents with small or tiny cracks in a bone. They tend to be more common in the lower limb than the upper limb because of the stress on the lower body. The bones of the foot, ankle and lower leg are most at risk to repetitive forces and stress absorbed during activities. Stress fractures begin when the muscles are fatigued and are unable to absorb the forces of the activity, thereby more force is transferred to the bone. Repetitive stress will cause damage that does not have time to heal, with every subsequent activity causing more damage until bone fractures and pain results. Sometimes the pain does not manifest until a few minutes into the activity, allowing the athlete to feel that is ok to push through the pain, which may cause further damage and injury.

The most common sites of stress fracture in the lower limbs are the metatarsals, particularly the second and third metatarsals. Another common area of injury is the tibia, the main load bearing bone of the lower leg, as it absorbs most of the forces during weight bearing activities. Uncommonly, stress fracture of the femur can occur. It is a very serious injury. Stress fractures of the femur is usually seen in those athletes that have increasing levels of activity without proper nutrition.

Athletes who play sports which require repetitive running and jumping are vulnerable stress fractures. It is also one of the most common sports injuries in military recruits. In the military, stress fracture is also called march fracture. This is likely due to the sudden increased demands of new recruits combined with the poor support afforded by military boots.

The most common symptom of a stress fracture is pain. Pain develops gradually and there is no other obvious sign of injury to the athlete (some rare cases may present with tenderness or swelling). Therefore, athletes continue to perform their usual activities without knowing that they already have an injury.

Treatment for Stress Fractures

In most cases, treatment of stress fractures includes rest and avoiding weight bearing activities. In some patients bracing can be used as well. This form of treatment allows the bone to heal on its own and usually takes 6-8 weeks. For those who want to remain physically active during this period, training focused on the upper body should be substituted for lower body activities.

In rare cases, the bone may not heal on its own due to the severity of the injury or underlying biological factors and a bone stimulator can be tried to avoid surgery. If warranted, a surgical procedure is performed to place a pin through the bone to secure the fracture and allow it to heal.

The most important aspect to healing properly from a stress fracture is consulting an orthopedic specialist at the first sign of injury so treatment can start immediately and further damage can be avoided.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


Why Are ACL Injuries More Common In Females?

(Posted on: December 15, 2016)

What is an ACL and why is it important?

Knee injuries account for about 40% of all sports injuries, with ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) injuries being one of the most common and impactful injuries. The ACL is one of the four major ligament of the knee and is one of the most injured. The ACL keeps the knee stabile by preventing excessive movement of the joint. It is a very important static stabilize. When an ACL injury occurs, the knee will often buckle and intense pain can be felt immediately.

ACL injuries occur from contact and noncontact sports but those who are most prone to ACL injuries are athletes who participate in high demand sports which require cutting, stepping, pivoting and jumping movements. Athletes who play sports like basketball, skiing, tennis, volleyball, football and soccer are at high risk of having an ACL injury. Studies have shown that females are significantly more likely to have an ACL injury than males who participate in the same sports.

Why do ACL injuries affect females more than males?

Females are more affected than males due to a range of anatomical, biomechanical and hormonal factors.  Female athletes who participate in pivoting and jumping sports are 8 times more likely to have ACL injury than males and are also three times more likely to have an ACL injury through noncontact mechanism.

Compared to men, females have, what is called a higher Q angle, which increases the tension of the ACL during certain movements. The Q angle is the measure of the angle of the femur in relation to the pelvis. As females tend to have a wider pelvis, this angle is increased, which can create a narrower compartment in the knee that houses the ACL. In addition this increasing variability of structures also affects the quadriceps muscle, which is an important dynamic stabilizer of the knee joint.

Women also tend to have a strength imbalance as they activate the quadriceps more than the hamstrings while accelerating or changing direction. Some women may also have weaker hip rotators (glutes) than their male counterparts. These anatomical differences can increase the risk of an ACL injury.

Recent studies have shown that hormonal imbalances, such as those found in high level female athletes can further place the female athlete at risk for not only ACL injury, but also stress fractures and other structural injuries.

What Can Be Done To Prevent ACL Injuries?

Given all of this information, it may seem too daunting for females to play sports – but that is absolutely not the case! There is nothing that should stop a female athlete from pursuing her passion and excelling at the highest level. However, certain precautions should be taken in an effort to lessen the chance of an ACL injury.

ACL Injury Prevention techniques include stretching and strengthening of the upper and lower leg muscles and have been shown to reduce the risk of injury substantially. Also, proper strength and endurance training should be maintained both during the season and in the offseason as well. Attention to proper sport mechanics is also vital to prevent aberrant movements that may play a role in developing an injury.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.

acl pain

achilles tendon pain
What to Do If You Have Achilles Tendinitis

(Posted on: December 15, 2016)

Achilles tendinopathy (also known as tendinitis) starts with inflammation of the Achilles tendon due to overuse or injury. It is common in those persons those who play sports or work out during the weekends or at an irregular schedule. It normally develops after abrupt changes in activity, training on uneven surfaces and using worn or poorly fitted shoes. If left untreated, this could lead to degeneration and damage of the tendon.

The most common cause is overuse of the foot or excessive stress transmitted to the tendon by the calf muscles. Too much stress will lead to micro-injury of the tendon fibers and, if not given proper time to heal, the body is not able to repair the tendon before it is injured again.

Managing Achilles Tendinopathy with Conservative Managements

Mild cases of Achilles tendinopathy usually respond to over the counter pain medications, activity modification and relative rest.

On the other hand, if the pain becomes chronic, physical therapy is often used. A physical therapist will teach patient how to stretch the calf muscle and Achilles tendon to avoid injury. In addition, strengthening of the calf muscle as well as the ankle and foot is also necessary for stability of the lower leg. Additional strengthening exercise include heel lifts and eccentric strengthening. Eccentric strengthening involves increasing the tension on the muscle/tendon complex through a lengthening contraction to correct the abnormal forces that lead to injury.

Physical Therapy program is often combined with ultrasound therapy or injection treatments that are administered by a sports medicine physician. Platelet Rich Plasma injections in particular have shown significant benefit in allowing the tendon to heal, even when small tears are present. Sometimes topical Nitric Oxide patches can be used to increase blood flow to the tendon to promote healing.

It is also very important to assess the quality of footwear to ensure proper fit and does not have excessive wear. Runners should generally change shoes every 300-500 miles or one year, whichever is first.

Managing Achilles Tendinopathy with Surgery

Surgery is a rare treatment for Achilles tendinopathy and is only performed when the tendon is already ruptured. Surgical options can be discussed with the orthopaedic surgeon, to decide which procedure is right for you. The type of surgery to be performed depends on the location of injury and the amount of tendon damage.

The most important factor to expedite healing of the tendon is to seek the advice of a sports medicine or orthopedic specialist in order to start treatment prior to further deterioration of the tendon and possible tendon rupture.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


What is Weightlifter’s Shoulder and How is it Treated?

(Posted on: December 15, 2016)

Weightlifter’s Shoulder is a term used to classify painful wear and tear of the distal end of the collar bone (clavicle). It is an overuse injury that can cause small fractures along the end of the collar bone and the AC joint. In some instances, osteolysis or bone breakdown occurs.

The condition is know as Weightlifter’s Shoulders because weightlifters are commonly affected due to the repetitive motions and heavy weight bearing loads on the shoulder joint associated with weightlifting. However, they are not the only ones affected and jackhammer operators, baseball and football players and soldiers can also develop this problem.

What Causes this Condition?

Repetitive trauma or stress from training and lifting can cause small fractures on the far end of the collarbone. When the elbows drop below or behind the body during bench press, excessive traction or pull on the AC (acromioclavicular) joint occurs. As a result, the shoulder comes into a position of excessive extension which causes deterioration of the joint space and micro fractures of the clavicle. When the bone does not have the chance to heal properly prior to the next training session, the shoulder can become painful and suffer from reduced strength and range of motion.

Treatment Options for Weightlifter’s Shoulder

Treatment for weightlifter’s shoulder usually starts with conservative or non-operative management. This may include rest and changes in weight-training activities and techniques. Over-training must be avoided so that the joint can heal. In addition a variable training program can aid in allowing the shoulder joint to heal while still allowing the athlete to continue activity. A physical therapist or athletic trainer can help with activity modification and design strength training in order to maintain fitness while allowing the joint and injury to heal.

For those who do not improve with conservative therapy, or have significant damage to the shoulder joint, a surgical procedure may be recommended. During surgery, the surgeon removes portions of the damaged end of the collarbone in a procedure known as “distal clavicle excision”.  This procedure is generally performed as an outpatient setting and most patients are able to return home the same day as their procedure as often this is done arthroscopically. Physical Therapy is often recommended after surgery to improve strength and restore range of motion. Fortunately, most patients suffer no loss of function in the shoulder after surgery and are able to resume normal activities following rehabilitation.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.

weight lifters shoulder

Dr. Michael Redler Speaks at the First Ever Mental Health and Medical Issues Summit

(Posted on: December 12, 2016)

Our own Dr. Michael Redler was a featured speaker at first-ever Mental Health and Medical Issues Summit in Piscataway, NJ.  Dr. Redler spoke about the art and science of Sports Medicine and taking care of the whole athlete, both physically and emotionally.  Watch some highlights below.


The Surgery Center of Fairfield County is Now Offering Outpatient Total Joint Replacement Procedures

(Posted on: December 12, 2016)

Trumbull, Conn., December 12, 2016 (Globe Newswire)Surgeons at The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) have begun offering outpatient total hip, knee and shoulder procedures at The Surgery Center of Fairfield County in Trumbull.

“We were extremely impressed with how efficiently everything was handled and how friendly yet professional all the staff members were, from reception to surgeon” said Mr. James Sorensen of Easton, one of the first to receive outpatient total hip replacement surgery. “Thank you so much for such outstanding care.”

The benefits of this surgery to outpatients, meaning those who don’t have to remain in the hospital post-surgery, are multifaceted. These benefits include comfort and convenience, lower exposure time to hospital-borne infections, a lower cost relative to a hospital stay and the ability to recover in the comfort of one’s own home. Because of advances in implant technology, pain management techniques and the expertise of the surgeons, recovery times are expedited, and hip and knee patients are able to walk short distances before leaving the surgery center.

Dr. Peter Boone, who performs more than 200 joint replacements annually and performed Mr. Sorensen’s hip replacement commented, “For joint replacement patients that are healthy, motivated and have a strong home support system, we believe that recovering in one’s own home is a better experience that encourages mobility early on in the recovery process. Our patients are extremely pleased with their experience at the Surgery Center. We have physicians, nurses and surgical technicians that strive hard every day to make sure they have the best possible outcomes.”

For more information on outpatient joint replacement surgery, contact OSM at 203-268-2882.

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About Surgery Center of Fairfield County

Conveniently located in Trumbull, Connecticut just off the Merritt Parkway, The Surgery Center of Fairfield County is a state-of-the-art multi-specialty surgical center offering a full range of elective procedures including orthopedic, pain, spine, ENT, gastroenterological, ophthalmology, gynecology and urology. The facility is a joint venture between local independent physicians and Surgical Care Affiliates. More information can be found at http://www.surgerycenteroffairfieldcounty.com.

 

About The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center is the greater Bridgeport area’s premier orthopaedic, sports medicine, spine, pain and physician therapy practice. OSM providers deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available utilizing primary care, podiatry, physiatry, chiropractic and physical trainers. OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Shelton, and Stratford. Additionally, OSM offers a convenient walk-in clinic with extended hours at its Trumbull facility. More information can be found at http://www.osmcenter.com.

outpatient hip replacement

The OSM Center Announces New Westport Location

(Posted on: November 30, 2016)

New Location To Provide Both Orthopedic Care and Orthopedic Urgent Care

WESTPORT, CT – DECEMBER 1, 2016 – The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center, which has been headquartered in Trumbull for over 20 years, has announced a new office location at 1800 Post Road East in Westport that is slated to open on January 9, 2017. With offices already located in Trumbull, Shelton, Stratford and Fairfield, this new location will be The OSM Center’s fifth office location in Connecticut.

The new 2,400 square foot Westport office will feature 6 exam rooms as well as on-site X-Ray.   All of The OSM Center’s specialties will be available to Westport residents including orthopedic care, spine care, pain management and sports medicine. The location will also be home to The OSM Center’s renowned orthopedic urgent care, OSM STAT which provides care for orthopedic and sports injuries with no appointment needed.

“We are excited to bring the high quality of care that OSM Center is known for to Westport,” says Dr. Daniel Weiland “Many of our physicians actually live in the Westport area, so we are very grateful to be able to become more of a part of this vibrant area and look forward to long and beneficial relationships with the Westport community.”

The OSM Center will be open Monday – Friday from 8:30am – 5pm.

OSM STAT will be open Monday – Friday 1pm – 8pm.

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 About The OSM Center

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center uses the collective skills of its exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. Often, that team will consist of outstanding primary care, podiatry, physiatry, chiropractic, physical therapists or other highly qualified members of the OSM team as we strive to address every condition with non-surgical options first. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.

At OSM, we are passionate about athletics and sports medicine. Our staff actively competes in endurance sports like marathons, triathlons as well as golf, tennis and a variety of other sports, so we understand an athlete’s priority to get back in the game quickly. We care for athletes at the highest level of professional, college and high-school sports as well as weekend warriors.

About OSM STAT

OSM STAT is a unique form of urgent care that provides immediate treatment of orthopedic and sports injuries in a walk-in setting. With skilled providers and on-site digital X-Ray, diagnosing an orthopedic injury is quick and easy. Our providers specialize in both Orthopedics and Sports Medicine and OSM STAT treats a variety of orthopedic injuries including strains, sprains, bone or joint injuries, fractures as well as a variety of sports injuries. Unlike the traditional urgent care center, we are experts in treating orthopedic and sports injuries in both adults and adolescents.


3 Tendinopathy and Tendinitis Facts You Should Know

(Posted on: November 23, 2016)

Tendons are the structures that attach muscle to bone throughout the body. Tendinopathy develops when a tendon becomes irritated, inflamed, torn or damaged. Tendinopathy is a very common condition, but many people underestimate the impact it can have on their lives. It is more commonly known as Tendonitis, however recent medical advances have revealed only initially is there inflammation of the tendon. Here are 3 facts you should know about Tendinopathy:

1. Tendinopathy can happen to anybody.

Although most common in more active individuals, anyone who uses repetitive movements or holds awkward positions at work or during the day can develop tendinopathy, especially those who may not be performing the repetitive action properly or with the optimal support. For instance, daily improper overhead lifting may cause rotator cuff injury that can lead to tendinopathy. Other common areas for tendinopathy include the elbow, foot/heel and knee. Swimmer’s shoulder and golfer’s or tennis elbow, Achilles tendinopathy are all different types of injury occurring at different sites.

2. Sometimes disease can cause tendinopathy.

Patients with diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis are more prone to tendinopathy and can develop more aggressive inflammation and possible damage to the tendon. According to recent research, patients with diabetes are three times more likely to develop tendon pain. Doctors however are still unclear about the underlying mechanisms.

3. Early treatment is paramount.

If a tendon becomes painful, treatment should be sought immediately with an orthopedic specialist. Treatments include physical therapy to build strength in the injured area as well as injections if symptoms are more severe.

If treatment is not started earlier enough a tendon may tear or rupture, causing a snap or pop and resulting in severe pain. This can also occur suddenly due to an injury. This is a more serious injury that requires surgery to repair the tendon.

Often times, patients with tendinopathy, also have tenosynovitis, especially patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. The sheath called the synovium produces a small amount of oily fluid to prevent friction when the tendon pulls on the bone. Tenosynovitis is the inflammation of the sheath or covering of the tendon which causes pain and loss of mobility in the tendon. Treatment for both tenosynovitis and tendinopathy are very similar.


At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.

tendonitis-treatment

Pushing The Envelope — Dr. Michael Redler Discusses The Value of Giving Back & The Many Factors Driving Orthopedics

(Posted on: October 13, 2016)

Earlier this month, our own Dr. Michael Redler was interviewed by Becker’s Orthopedic Review to discuss his inspiration for traveling on a medical mission to Honduras as well as innovations in Orthopedics and Sports Medicine.  Read the interview below:

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Question: What spurred you to pursue a career in medicine & what continues to excite you?

Dr. Michael Redler: When I was young, I was fascinated by the ability to help people and see how the body works. I was on a local TV show when I was four years old, and I said I wanted to be a doctor. That passion stayed with me very early on and never changed.

Something that I am very passionate about is that I just got back from my second mission trip to Honduras. These brigades are supported by Surgical Care Affiliates Medical Missions. The need in Honduras is unbelievably great, and during our trip, we were able to provide help at the surgery center and interact with children at the orphanage. I had the opportunity to operate with my daughter, an orthopedic surgeon at Columbia-Presbyterian in New York. It was the greatest experience being able to give back.

Q:  What trends are taking hold in the sports medicine field?

MR: I am the head team physician for Scared Heart University, a division-one school, and am seeing a handful of changes in the industry.

We take a team approach for providing comprehensive care to the athlete. This not only involves the orthopedic surgeon but physical medicine and rehab primary care nutritionists psychologist and other subspecialties.

We are also seeing diagnostic advancements and advancements in minimally invasive techniques that have allowed us to return more athletes to the playing field in a quicker fashion. It gets to the point where athletes will look for physicians able to do more advanced techniques.

Modern sports medicine care involves a team approach with greater communication between coaches, certified athletic trainers and physicians. With better communication so that everyone is on the same page the care of the athlete is optimized.

Q: What will orthopedic surgery look like in the next few years? What are the opportunities for orthopedic surgeons?

MR: We are doing more and more with MIS and more cases with a regional anesthetic. More complex cases can be done as outpatient procedures, such as total joints and spine.

The ability to have outstanding care in ambulatory surgery centers, advances in MIS and anesthesia techniques have changed the whole thinking on where cases can be done and what can be done in an ASC. That has helped push that envelope of orthopedics.

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Dr. Michael Redler and Lauren H. Redler, MD, operating together at the Holy Family Surgical Center in Honduras.


What Treatments Are Effective for Sciatica?

(Posted on: October 3, 2016)

Sciatica is a common term for pain that originates in the lumbar spine and radiates into the buttocks, legs and feet.   Sciatica sufferers often have difficulty climbing stairs, walk long distances or getting a good nights sleep.   However, many people are unaware that Sciatica is not actually a condition but rather a symptom of an underlying spinal condition.

The sciatic nerve is the longest continuous nerve in the body as it begins in the lumbar spine and extends down through each leg. In most cases, Sciatica is the irritation of the L4, L5 or S1 spinal nerves as a result of a herniated disc, Spinal Stenosis or other spine condition that causes compression of one of these nerves. It is important to seek medical attention at the onset of this condition, as it may indicated injury of a spinal nerve.  If treated early, the pain will subside with no lasting nerve damage.  However, if left untreated, irreversible damage to the nerve can occur causing chronic pain and potential loss of certain functions of the leg.

Luckily, Sciatica can be treated using several modalities including:

1. Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care is a safe and effective method of treatment for many musculoskeletal disorders affecting the extremities and the spine, including Sciatica.  Our chiropractic physicians will take a thorough history, perform a physical exam and in certain cases, will order imaging to help identify what is causing your sciatic complaint.

The chiropractic treatment at OSM would then focus on improving function, reducing irritation to the sciatic nerve, restoring your range of motion, and strengthening the muscles of the core and abdominal region.

Dr. Pagliaro Haywood and Dr. Barnes work side-by-side with the other members of our spine team to individualize your care.  For your convenience, they treat patients in the Fairfield, Shelton and Trumbull locations.

2. Physical Therapy

If Sciatica is in its early phases and is not constant, Physical Therapy can be very effective in reducing the pain and discomfort caused by the pain. The goal of physical therapy is to strengthen the muscles surrounding the spine and abdomen (core muscles), which will help in maintaining proper alignment of the spine and take pressure of the segments of the lumbar spine responsible for the pain.

At The OSM Center, we provide on-site Physical Therapy in our Trumbull, Shelton and Fairfield offices. Our expert Physical Therapy team uses the latest advancements in Physical Therapy to get patients back to a healthy and active lifestyle.

3. Physiatry and Pain Management

Interventional techniques are often used in conjunction with Physical Therapy to maximize pain relief. These techniques include corticosteroid and pain relief injections that specifically target the spinal nerves and reduce the symptoms associated with Sciatica. These safe and effective interventional procedures are provided by fellowship trained Physiatrists, who are experts in treating conditions of the spine and spinal nerves.

At The OSM Center, our Physiatry Team is led by Dr. Isaac Cohen and Dr. Gene Tekmyster. Both doctors work closely with the Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, Sports Medicine, Spine Surgery and Orthopedic Specialists at OSM Center to create a unique treatment protocol for each patient.

4. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

If Physical Therapy and Pain Management are not effective, decompressing the spinal nerves via a surgical procedure may be necessary. At OSM, we are experts in the use of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery options for those patients considering surgery.

One option is a procedure known as a Minimally Invasive Microdiscectomy. This procedure uses a small incision and small surgical tools to access the spine and remove only the herniated portion of the spinal disc that is causing irritation to the spinal nerve. By removing portions of the disc, the nerve is no longer compromised, with healing allowing to take place.

One of the most significant benefits of this approach is that the small surgical instruments are placed between the muscles of the spine, as opposed to dissecting the muscles as was necessary with traditional spine surgery. This allows the body to heal much more quickly after the procedure and significantly reduces scarring and recovery time.

 At the OSM Center, Board Certified Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Dr. Gerard Girasole leads the Spine Surgery Team. Dr. Girasole is on the forefront of Minimally Invasive surgical techniques for patients with neck and back pain and he is very active in the training of other surgeons in the various techniques. The multi-disciplinary Spine Team at OSM Center gives you the advantage of collaboration between diagnostic, surgical and rehabilitation experts to create the ideal treatment plan for your unique case.

If you, or someone you love, is suffering from Sciatica, contact us today to schedule a consultation with one of our Spine Experts!

sciatic pain

physiatrist
What is a Physiatrist and When Should I See One?

(Posted on: October 3, 2016)

If you are suffering from an orthopedic or sports injury, your first search may be for an Orthopedic Surgeon. However, many patients are referred to a Physiatrist by their Orthopedic Surgeons for conservative treatments and protocols to help avoid surgery. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) physicians, also known as Physiatrists, treat a wide variety of medical conditions affecting the spine, nerves, bones, joints, ligaments, muscles, and tendons. The goal of Physiatry is to restore function to those who are dealing with pain, muscle weakness, numbness and muscle spasms – without surgery.

How Are Physiatrists Trained?

Similar to other medical specialties, Physiatry requires 4 years of medical school followed by an additional 4 years of residency training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. They also may be subspecialty certified in Brain Injury Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Neuromuscular Medicine, Pain Medicine, Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Spinal Cord Injury Medicine, and/or Sports Medicine.

 What Treatments Does a Physiatrist Provide?

Some of the most common reasons patients seek the expertise of a Physiatrist is for chronic pain issues, such as back or neck pain, ligament injuries and arthritis. A Physiatrist often uses a multi-disciplinary approach to treat patients that includes conservative modalities, including Physical Therapy, in conjunction with medication or injection therapy. Other treatments that Physiatrist perform, when necessary, include:

  • EMG/Nerve Conduction Studies
  • Joint Injections
  • Ultrasound Guided Procedures
  • Fluoroscopy Guided procedures
  • PRP Injections
  • Injections of Spine
  • Nerve Stimulators, Blocks and Ablation procedures
  • Manual Medicine/Osteopathic Treatment

At The OSM Center, our Physiatry Team is led by Dr. Isaac Cohen and Dr. Gene Tekmyster. Both doctors work closely with the Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, Sports Medicine, Spine Surgery and Orthopedic Specialists at OSM Center to create a unique treatment protocol for each patient.  Click here to schedule a consultation with one of our expert Physiatrists!


OSM Team Participates in Westport Kiwanis Minuteman Triathlon 2016

(Posted on: September 15, 2016)

Check Out Some Photos Of The OSM Team at Westport Kiwanis Minuteman Triathlon 2016:

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Dr. Michael Redler Joining SCA Medical Missions to Hondoras

(Posted on: September 6, 2016)

The OSM Center is proud to announce that our own Dr. Michael Redler will be joining SCA Medical Missions, in conjunction with Holy Family Surgery Center, for a week long medical mission to Honduras.  Dr. Redler will be joining a brigade of medical volunteers including surgeons, nurses, anesthesiologists, physical therapists and others to provide quality surgical care for those in need.

The surgery center is located on the grounds of a large orphanage run by a not-for-profit organization called NPH International. This location allows for surgeons and teammates to bring their spouses and children to join in helping at the orphanage in the garden, kitchen and other areas by playing with children, rocking babies and helping with general grounds upkeep. They can also can help in various ways at the surgery center.

Learn more about this amazing mission in this video.

 


The OSM Center and OSM Stat Will Be Closed for Labor Day

(Posted on: September 1, 2016)

Both The OSM Center and OSM Stat will be closed today, September 5, 2016 in observance of the holiday.  We will resume normal business hours on September 6, 2016.

Have a safe and happy Labor Day!

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tennis-elbow-pain
Is the Pain in My Elbow “Tennis Elbow”?

(Posted on: August 3, 2016)

Despite what the name may imply, Tennis Elbow is not relegated only to tennis players and is actually an injury that stems from overuse of the elbow tendons. The medical term for Tennis Elbow is lateral epicondylitis, and is an inflammation of the tendons of the forearm where they insert into the elbow joint. The term Tennis Elbow was coined due to the fact that the repetitive elbow motion required of tennis players often led to this injury. However, there are several other sports and occupations that have a very high instance of lateral epicondylitis.  — Who Gets Tennis Elbow? In fact, housekeepers, painters, carpenters, plumbers, auto workers, cooks and other labor occupations are statistically more likely to suffer this injury than an athlete. The reason for this is thought to be the repetitive motion of using tools, coupled with the constant lifting of heavy objects puts excess strain on the elbow tendons.

This injury is also common among those who engage in weight training at the gym several times per week. If proper form is not used when curling, bench-pressing or fly exercises, small tears in the tendons are not able to properly heal and can cause the pain associated with lateral epicondylitis. — What Are the Symptoms? The symptoms of this condition are progressive and only begin as mild pain or discomfort in the beginning.  As the condition progresses, the pain can become more chronic.  The most common symptoms are:

-Pain at the outside of the elbow

-Burning feeling at the outside of the elbow

-Difficulty gripping objects

-Soreness in the forearm

-Pain that is worse when squeezing an object  — How Is It Treated? Fortunately, 80%-95% of lateral epicondylitis injuries can be treated using conservative modalities such as physical therapy and/or therapeutic injections. The goal of physical therapy will be strengthen the muscles, tendons and ligaments of the elbow to increase mobility and reduce pain.

In rare instances, the injury may require a surgical procedure to repair the damaged tendons and reattach the tendon to its intended position on the bone. This procedure is generally performed using a Minimally Invasive approach with the utilization of a small incision along the outer aspect of the elbow and can be performed on an outpatient basis.

At The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center we utilize the collective skills of our exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.


At OSM, we are passionate about athletics and sports medicine. Our staff actively competes in endurance sports like marathons, triathlons as well as golf, tennis and a variety of other sports, so we understand an athlete’s priority to get back in the game quickly. We care for athletes at the highest level of professional, college and high-school sports as well as weekend warriors.


Preparing for the Westport Kiwanis Triathlon – Presented by OSM

(Posted on: August 2, 2016)

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The Fairfield County Bank Westport Kiwanis Triathlon presented by The OSM Center is around the corner, only 40 days away. We need you and your family to register today as we want it to be a great success! This is our major fundraiser for college scholarships and we need you to race with us! To register go to http://www.trifitness.net/kiwanis.html#kiwanis

To help you prepare for the race we are offering a free rehearsal onAugust 29 at 8am at Compo Beach. It is free for all our registered racers. Please let us know if you would like to join us by sending us an email at pascale@trifitnes.net .

If you need help with your swimming we have the perfect program for you with Olympian Sheila Taormina on August 20 and 21. For a full schedule and to register go to   http://www.trifitness.net/sheila.html .

We have only a few spots left in some of the categories.

See you all soon,

All the best,

Pascale Butcher

Race Director

Camp Director

USAT Level 2 Triathlon Coach

Ironman Triathlon Coach

Speed and Agility Certified Coach

www.trifitness.net

 

 


OSM and OSM Stat Will Be Closed July 4th

(Posted on: June 29, 2016)

In observance of the holiday, both the OSM Center and OSM Stat will be closed on Monday July 4th, 2016.  We will reopen for normal business hours on July 5th, 2016.

Have a safe and happy 4th of July!

-The OSM Center


THE ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS

(Posted on: June 13, 2016)

JUNE 9, 2016 – TRUMBULL, CTThe Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull recently announced the winners of their annual scholarships. The awards were given to high school scholar athletes planning to attend college this fall. OSM offers these scholarships to outstanding high school seniors who excel in three areas: student athletic achievements, academic accomplishments and community service. The scholarship is open to high schools where OSM serves as team physicians and include: Trumbull High School, St. Joseph High School, Masuk High School, Warren Harding High School, Central High School, Notre Dame High School and Bassick High School.

“Assisting the student athlete to move toward their goal is very rewarding, said OSM Orthopedic Surgeon Michael Redler, MD. “Our practice is proud to follow these students throughout their high school athletic careers and to serve as their team physicians. This program keeps us connected to the community we serve.”

The winners of this year’s scholarships were Jasmine Clark (Central High School), Neyalon Vereen (Notre Dame High School), Patrick Carroll (Trumbull High School), Ali Moraveck (Monroe High School), Cameron Ryan (St. Joseph High School) and Gloria Fiefie (Warren Harding High School).

 

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Photo: The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center (OSM) of Trumbull’s physicians and this year’s scholarship winners. Standing Back Row (l-r): Michael R. Redler, M.D., Gerard J. Girasole, M.D., Mark E. Wilchinsky, M.D., Peter S. Boone, M.D. Front Row (l-r) Jasmine Clarke, Neyalon Vereen, Patrick Carroll, Ali Moraveck, Cameron Ryan, (not present) Gloria Fiefie

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About The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center
OSM surgeons specialize in all aspects of bone and joint surgery as well as sports medicine and orthopedic surgery. The practice consists of two chiropractors, a podiatrist, two physiatrists, physician assistants, and athletic trainers. OSM has offices in Trumbull, Fairfield, Stratford, and Shelton as well as The OSM Therapy Centers in Trumbull, Fairfield and Shelton.

OSM includes orthopedic surgeons Michael R. Redler, MD; Peter S. Boone, MD; Gerard J. Girasole, MD; David J. Martin, MD; James I. Spak, MD; Daniel E. Weiland, MD; Mark E. Wilchinsky, MD. In addition, Isaac Cohen, MD; Michelle Pagliaro Haywood, DC; Gene Tekmyster, DO; Alan F. Feldman, DPM; Benjamin G. Barnes, DC, Marissa M. Smith, MD; Rolando L. Lopez, PA-C, Carrie A. Rossi, PA-C, John M. Carravone, PA-C, Michael J. Hann, PA-C and Kate Nadler, ATC, Sports Medicine Coordinator.

Their website is www.osmcenter.com.


OSM STAT (Walk-In) Friday 6/9/16 Hours

(Posted on: June 9, 2016)

Hello Everyone!

Our walk-in Orthopedic Urgent Care (OSM STAT) will not be open until 2:00PM on 6/9/16. Thank you for your understanding! We will be open for normal hours after that time (2:00PM – 8:00PM).


Holiday Hours!

(Posted on: May 27, 2016)

OSM STAT will be open Saturday, 5/28/16 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and Sunday, 5/29/16, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Both OSM and OSM STAT will be closed on Monday. Thank You!


3 Signs of a Rotator Cuff Tear

(Posted on: May 24, 2016)

The rotator cuff is the set of muscles and tendons that act together to form a cuff which holds the shoulder in place and enables it to move freely in different directions. While the shoulder is one of the most mobile joints in the body, it is also the most vulnerable, especially when exposed to a great deal of stress. Those who play sports requiring repetitive shoulder motion and those with physically demanding jobs that require heavy lifting can be more exposed to developing a rotator cuff tear due to wear and tear on the shoulder. However, the rotator cuff can also be injured due to a sudden force or trauma such as falling on the shoulder or using the arm to prevent a fall.

For many, it may be difficult to differentiate whether shoulder pain is the result of overexertion and soreness, or a more severe injury. Below are 3 common indications of a rotator cuff injury.

3 Common Symptoms Associated with Torn Rotator Cuff

1. Pain

Naturally, those with a torn rotator cuff will experience pain that is most often present in the front of the shoulder but can radiate through the arm. This pain may increase with activity or when lying on the affected side. Many times rotator cuff pain makes it difficult to sleep at night. The level of pain may or may not depend on how severe the tear actually is.

2. Decreased Strength and Inability to Perform Daily Tasks

A rotator cuff tear is a disruptive injury that may prevent patients from carrying on with activities of daily living. This can include tasks such as carrying objects or raising the arm above the head. This pain and limitation in mobility may make it difficult to perform job functions especially for those in the field of construction, painting and other jobs that require manual labor.

3. Abnormal Test Results

During an initial physical exam, an orthopedic specialist will try to identify the main cause of pain by moving the patient’s arms in various positions. If the orthopedic specialist suspects and underlying injury the physical exam may be followed by a series of additional tests, including X-rays or an MRI scan. Abnormal test results are the tool that often offers the most accurate information on the severity of the injury.

What Should You Do If You Think You Have a Tear?
If you notice any of the symptoms listed above, it is best to consult an orthopedic specialist as soon as possible. A specialist will recommend the best course of action, which may involve conservative treatment (ice packs, anti-inflammatory medication, resting the joint, and physical therapy meant to strengthen the injured joint). In other instances, a surgical intervention may be recommended if what is known as a “full thickness tear” is present.

If surgery is recommended, most rotator cuff tears can be treated using an arthroscopic procedure. This is usually an outpatient procedure that delivers excellent results and only requires small incisions. In most cases, postoperative recommendations involve physical therapy to help the entire arm recover its strength and mobility.


The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine (OSM) Center uses the collective skills of its exceptional providers to deliver the most complete musculoskeletal care available. From your first appointment, you are cared for by a team specifically built based on the best treatment for your condition. If surgery is necessary, you will be paired with an OSM surgeon who has the expertise and experience in your specific condition. Our surgeons use the latest minimally invasive techniques where appropriate to ensure fast recovery.  Contact us today to schedule a consult.

At OSM, we are passionate about athletics and sports medicine. Our staff actively competes in endurance sports like marathons, triathlons as well as golf, tennis and a variety of other sports, so we understand an athlete’s priority to get back in the game quickly. We care for athletes at the highest level of professional, college and high-school sports as well as weekend warriors.


Dr. Redler, Dr. Weiland and Dr. Spak Named Top Docs

(Posted on: April 12, 2016)

Congratulations to our own Dr. Redler, Dr. Weiland and Dr. Spak, who have been named in the Connecticut Magazine as Top Docs!

See the full list here.

spakweilandredler


Scholarship Program

(Posted on: April 12, 2016)

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center will be offering a $2,000.00 Scholarship and several additional scholarships to students from the following high schools: Bassick, Central, Masuk, Notre Dame, St. Joseph, Trumbull and Warren Harding. The student must be a graduating senior who is planning to attend college in the fall of 2016.

The completed application package must be post marked by May 13, 2016.  You may download the application here.

Please have interested students complete the scholarship application package and submit it with the required documentation me at the below address.

If you should require any additional information, please feel free to contact me.

Thank You.

 

Lisa Jaser, MS

Human Resources Manager

The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center

888 White Plains Road

Trumbull, CT 06611

Tel. 203.268.2882 ext 3326

ljaser@osmcenter.com;

 

For more information on OSM’s Scholarship Program, please click here.


Our own Dr. Michael Redler was recently featured

(Posted on: February 1, 2016)

Our own Dr. Michael Redler was recently featured in local media regarding his innovative use of platelet-rich plasma therapy, or ‘stem cell lite’, to treat a patient suffering from tennis elbow and a torn tendon.Learn More


Michael Redler, MD (The Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center, Trumbull, Conn.)

(Posted on: December 7, 2015)

Dr. Redler is a founding partner of OSM and is an orthopedic consultant to Major League Lacrosse. He has also served as the head team physician for the athletic department of Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Conn., and Connecticut’s Bridgeport Bluefish minor league baseball team. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Redler is a professor for Sacred Heart’s athletic training and physical therapy program, and a visiting consultant for The University of Virginia division of hand surgery and sports medicine. During his career, Dr. Redler has published many articles in journals such as Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery and led arthroscopy courses throughout the United States and Europe. The New York Times and other publications have called him for expertise on how athletes can handle sports medicine injuries. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and a member of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Society of Arthroscopy Knee Surgery. Dr. Redler earned his medical degree at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and completed a fellowship in sports medicine and hand surgery at The University of Virginia.


Michael Redler, MD named one of 70 best knee surgeons in America!

(Posted on: December 7, 2015)

The following knee surgeons were selected based on awards they received from major organizations in the field, leadership in those organizations, work on professional publications and positions of service at hospitals and surgery centers. The surgeons are listed in alphabetical order by last name. All physicians who are placed on the list undergo substantial review from our editorial staff and industry leaders. Physicians do not pay and cannot pay to be selected as a best physician. This list is not an endorsement of any individual’s or organization’s clinical abilities.

This list is sponsored by Bacterin International.


Dr. Gerard Girasole in the spotlight

(Posted on: December 7, 2015)

OSM’s Dr. Girasole has been featured as one of 13 spine surgeons spotlighted in Becker’s Spine Review E-Weekly for co-authoring his book about back pain called “The 7-Minute Back Pain Solution”. The full article can be seen here.


Michael R. Redler awarded Carrer Service Award

(Posted on: December 7, 2015)

Dr. Redler he was awarded a Career Service Award for 25 years of dedicated service to the Sacred Heart University Department of Athletics. The event took place on April 27th, 2014.


Michael Redler MD included in “100 ASC Industry Physician Leaders to Know”

(Posted on: December 7, 2015)

Physicians are the founding force and backbone of the ambulatory surgery center industry. Here are 100 physicians who have made an impact on the ASC industry through leadership at individual centers, creating companies, founding ASCs and advocating for surgery centers across the country. Read full article…